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Strangles in the barn we're in lock down
#1
Well what a few days it's been. A good friend at the barn had her young gelding come down ill and test results came back positive for Strangles. We don't know the strain yet but it's acting like the strep variety. He is so ill. The abcesses were lanced yesterday so the the barn is in quarantine. I had already started putting out hand sanitizer and hanging up notices that my animals were not to be turned out at all and spraying bleach on the feet after riding and putting them in their stalls. Now today everyone got on the band wagon which is good. The better aware other owners can be about cross contamination we all benefit. Currently two horses are sick. Otter the young one was taken across the property to isolate on Wed but another horse came down so they covered his stall with plastic and have put out bleach foot baths. Good thing our horses are in a different aisle. It helps since we don't go to the section of the barn where the sick horses were. So, daily temps, bleach feet and clean hands in between handling each of our animals... I was very happy to see some of the younger kids using the hand cleaner so it's peer pressure in a good way [Smile]
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#2
We seem to be having a local (Clackamas county, Oregon) outbreak of pigeon fever. Neither of our horses are affected at this time.

There is some speculation that the vector is flies. How would isolation help if flies are mobile enough to go from ranch to ranch?
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#3
We haven't had to experience strangles ourselves but we sure sympathize with you. Here's hoping the precautions you are taking keep it under control until the danger passes.

Here is a link to a previous discussion that has a bit of information dealing with afterwards.

http://www.dailyequine.com/forums/topic.asp?ARCHIVE=true&TOPIC_ID=2744

Sending healthy thoughts your way.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#4
Isolation of the sick animals is to reduce the possibility of transmission by contact of animal to animal or common water source. Flies don't really live long and I don't think they travel on their own far. With all the discussion about "how could it happen" to a barn that is not the type for lots of hauling in/out Really thinking the probable cause is farrier. They have their rigs open at calls, they get flies and then closed up and driven across town to the next stop and doors open and flied out.. they also use tools without cleaning between animals. In any case another older mare spiked her temp this morning and they are getting her on antibiotics as she is not contagious at this point. All of mine continue to be bright eyed and temps are below normal. I have never used the turn out that all sick horses seem to have in common. The disease is in the dirt as well. Just so many things to watch etc.. Fly traps are out and it's like a score card [Big Grin] who has the highest count of dead flies.
Laurie
Andalusians NW,
Ridgefield, WA
Green+Green=black & blue(treasure the knowledge of an experienced horse)
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#5
If you can I'd pick up a sanitizer that's better than clorox. Used carefully it will work but it breaks down fast in the presence of organic material (ie manure....) If you are using it it should be made up freshly several times a day. All shoes have to be CLEAN before using bleach footbath because the dirt/manure/gunk on the shoes will inactivate the bleach. Same goes with stalls, they need to be scrubbed down and completely clean in order for clorox to work well.

Better to use a quatemory ammonium chloride like A-33 disinfectant (google it, its available online or from your vet) Cheap and more effective than bleach.

Sorry to hear about your bad luck[Sad]. Hopefully your horse won't get it but if your horses temperature goes up will your vet prescribe penicillin? Strangles is caused by Streptococcus equi subspecie equi (commonly called S equi) and strep is well known to be very responsive to EARLY procaine penicillin treatment. Unfortunately once the abscesses have formed it won't work, penicillin doesn't penetrate the abscess wall.

Just something to think about .... Many vets like to think that strangles has to run its course but that's not necessarily the case.
<'\__~
_(( // ====

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#6
I sure hope you can escape! I've never had to deal with the disease and hope I never have to. Would starting on antis now prevent yours from getting it?
Karen ~ Trails  
  &
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN

"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."
[Image: th_horse-galloping.gif]  

~~~~~~
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#7
I'm not sure any vet would give penicillin in the absence of clinical signs?[confused2 The trouble is that strangles tends to cycle, hitting one batch of horses, contaminating the environment and then several weeks later you'll get another outbreak in the horses ....and so on... it can be a problem for quite awhile [Sad] Not sure I'd blame the farrier, as anyone who so much as patted a horse at a different barn and visited yours could be the culprit. People who attend horse auctions are really risking it too. Its REALLY contagious. Thankfully with good treatment it rarely has any long lasting complications. And many older horses seem to carry some immunity.

In my area a bunch of people just rescued some unwanted horses from the kill buyer. They pooled together and hired a trailer to drop them off at their various new homes. Yep, you guessed it one of them had strangles and one by one all of the horses have come down with it and those that didn't quarantine are now regretting it. [Sad][Sad]

By the way andalusn, it is the nasal discharge that carries the bacteria into the environment and coughing spreads it even farther. If the "newest" case, the mare, has nasal discharge she's contagious.

Hopefully they are using penicillin? NOT TMP/SMZ??
<'\__~
_(( // ====

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#8
Well that figures. If it was something easy enough to prevent, it wouldn't be the problem it is!

I got to thinking (a rare event) and believe Bud (my maybe new horse) came down with strangles shortly after he was purchased by my neighbor. He was a sick boy as I remember but was on the mend by the time the farrier came. My neighbor was standing directly in front of him and we were chatting when Bud ummmmm "cleared his sinuses". Snot when EVERYWHERE including all over my neighbor's clothes and face. I still don't think she thought it was nearly as funny as I did.
Karen ~ Trails  
  &
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN

"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."
[Image: th_horse-galloping.gif]  

~~~~~~
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#9
quote:
Originally posted by PaintGal

Snot when EVERYWHERE including all over my neighbor's clothes and face. I still don't think she thought it was nearly as funny as I did.



I have been kept busy after work with the horses..seeing more owners at the barn in the evenings than ever before. I tell ya, don't stand still too long or someone will take your temp [Big Grin] that would be a rude surprise.

Appears that only the 3 yr old will be the lanced one..the other 3 are on drugs and the oldest with lumps, those are already going down. My 3 continue to run temps 97-99 range depending on the horse. Happy to see me and begging for their goodies. Quarantine continues through first week in Nov if all continues as it's going.

[Image: quarantin1c.jpg]
Laurie
Andalusians NW,
Ridgefield, WA
Green+Green=black & blue(treasure the knowledge of an experienced horse)
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#10
If feels like forever...barn is still in quarantine and appears it will be that way until after the first week in November. A second horse developed abscesses that were lanced and rule is 30 days from the last lancing. There are about 60 horses in the barn and there are a total of 8 horses in quarantine. Taking daily temps. Mine all run low 98's to 100 depending on how sunny it is and if they are blanketed. Hale and hearty and stomping for grain. No depressed attitudes on my little herd and I hope it stays that way. We continue to spray hooves with bleach water when they come back to their stalls and include ourselves into the cleaning.

Exercise has been the roughest part. Turnouts are closed as contaminated, can't leave the property so trails are closed off. That leaves the arena and I am taking the approach like a play ground full of sick kids.. don't go there. We lunge late at night when the place is quiet to limit the exposure to other horses. I think we are on the downhill side of this whole experience. Some animals that are sick have received the strangles vaccine and then my doc does not include it in the yearly protocol of shots so we skip it. They have run the spectrum of really down and out sick (vaccinated horses) to mild coughing and runny nose.
Laurie
Andalusians NW,
Ridgefield, WA
Green+Green=black & blue(treasure the knowledge of an experienced horse)
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