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To Shoe or Not to Shoe
#1
While surfing this morning found this site/article. Presents a very "good" illustration of the "mechanics" of the hoof in relation to the legs and movement of the horse.

Thought it was worth reading for any horse owner!

http://www.barefootnaturalhoof.com/no%20shoes.htm

Dixieme
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#2
Thanks for the link. That article does explain the mechanics and movement in the hoof pretty well. However, the article seems to be very one-sided in opposition to shoeing! I believe some horses need shod. Granted, horses in the wild have done, and will do, very well being unshod for millenia. However, our horses today are not wild and free to stand, walk, or run whenever and wherever they choose. When we bring them into our world, we change where, when, and how they walk on their feet. Sometimes they need shoes to help them do what we want them to do. If we all want to turn our horses loose to be free, then we can probably do away with farriers all together!
Not saying you are necessarily preaching barefoot for all horses, but that article seemed to.
Just my 2 cents worth.
"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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#3

That was very informative. It just shows me how much we owe it to our horses to give them the best care we can. We do force them into unnatural living environments and cause them to perform in ways that they would never do if given a choice. Thank you for posting that, Dixieme.
A good rider has a thinking mind, fine emotions and a sensitive hand.-Tu Yu,72 BC

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#4

I really don't know much about how trim your horse. I would like to learn to do the basic maintenance of a trim. I have been interested in what is called trimming from the top. It seems so logical and I've heard lots of good about using this method of maintaining your horses feet. I know there are lots of knowledgable people here, can I have your opinions on this? What do you who trim your own horses do? Thank you!
A good rider has a thinking mind, fine emotions and a sensitive hand.-Tu Yu,72 BC

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#5
Dixie, good article. Been doing barefoot trim last year, farrier was vet recommended as "the artisit". My TB's bad feet improved without shoes. I don't ride hard or on super rough stuff though.

Think I'm paying about the same as trim is more frequent (every 5 wks) for 3...and NOT cheap ($55 each)!

Happy to pay someone else...I'm lousy at filing my own darn nails!
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#6
quote:
Originally posted by Montezrider

I really don't know much about how trim your horse. I would like to learn to do the basic maintenance of a trim. I have been interested in what is called trimming from the top. It seems so logical and I've heard lots of good about using this method of maintaining your horses feet. I know there are lots of knowledgeable people here, can I have your opinions on this? What do you who trim your own horses do? Thank you!



MR, Here is a copy from another post outlining my basic experience with the Natural Trim.

I think utilizing the principles of " Natural Trim" will only improve horse's feet.

I heartily recommend that you get a copy of Pete Ramey's book, "Making Natural Hoof Care Work For You" (or check out his website below)It does have detailed pictures and suggestions regard how to do the natural trim.

I have been trimming our own horses' hooves for the last 30+ years. We have had shoes on the horses when they were shown but have evolved to where we are now.

Profit had shoes when we were showing him quite heavy but has not had shoes for the last three years. Hookie, now 8, has never had shoes and the three four year olds as well as Cruiser have never had shoes.

I was really impressed with the knowledge and thoughts outlined in Pete's book and have changed my trimming style recently to reflect the basics of the Natural hoof trim. I am very pleased with the results. There is a definite improvement in sole hardness with less fraying or crack development in the hoof wall between trims.

We do have a set of "Old Mac" boots for the fronts of both Hookie and Profit but they do not get much use.

I have come to the conclusion that shoes are really only necessary for unusual corrective work or in cases of excessive hoof wear. A balanced diet which includes a ration balancer will, coupled with a regular 4 to 6 week trim program, generate a strong healthy hoof that will stand up to almost any type of normal riding environment.
Further down this page are links to websites for Pete Ramey and Jaime Jackson, two forerunners in the Natural Hoof Care movement.

[Edit] Related Links
Pete Ramey - Making Natural Hoof Care Work For You
http://www.hoofrehab.com/
Jaime Jackson - Helping Horses Naturally with Natural Hoof Carehttp://www.primechoice.com/jaime-jackson/



Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#7
Neither of my horses have ever had shoes on their feet. I haven't been happy with the durablity of their hooves in between trims lately and I am educatin myself on Natural Hoof Care.

Currently reading Jackson book and I hope to have both his and Rameys done by next Wednesday so I can talk intelligently about this to my farrier. Both Joe and Rocky's feet are a mess and Joe's started chipping and breaking 2 weeks after his last trim.

Thanks for the link!
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#8
quote:
Originally posted by ILoveJoe

Neither of my horses have ever had shoes on their feet. I haven't been happy with the durability of their hooves in between trims lately and I am educating myself on Natural Hoof Care.

Currently reading Jackson book and I hope to have both his and Rameys done by next Wednesday so I can talk intelligently about this to my farrier. Both Joe and Rocky's feet are a mess and Joe's started chipping and breaking 2 weeks after his last trim.

Thanks for the link!



Although both books cover the same subject I think Pete Ramey has done a better job of adaption of the Natural Trim to how we keep our horses today. I really like his philosophy and explanations and it works for me.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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