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Stall Bedding
#1
Just wondering about stall bedding. We have switched to the pellets from traditional shavings. I like the fact it stacks, bed right and it lasts for weeks with little maintenance. Fly population is down. It composts quickly so local landscape businesses will pay to haul it away. What do you use for bedding? Has the price increased? Is it easy to get?

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#2
My horses currently are NOT stalled, but before I did use the bagged pine shavings. ALOT of waste there. I don't know if I will try the pelleted bedding once we get stalls finished or not. I know folks that use the pelleted bedding and swear by it, and others that switched to it and switched back to shavings because of cost. (Their reason)

Now the woman I had been taking lessons from uses pelleted bedding and she was using the stuff for wood stoves! Anyone ever hear if there is a difference between them and the bedding pellets?

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#3
I'd like to look into the pellets for bedding for my "eventual" barn. What are they made of? Where can they be purchased? Anyone have a website available? Not sure if they are offered here in AR but worth checking into.
Thanks for the reply!

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#4
quote:
Originally posted by ILoveJoe

stuff for wood stoves! Anyone ever hear if there is a difference between them and the bedding pellets?



The reps say that their is a difference in the content. The ones for wood stoves contain ingredients that are not for animal bedding which horse could ingest when they are snuffling the stall floor. We run into times here when the feed stores can't get "animal bedding" pellets because the demand for wood stoves is high and production is dedicated to that market. Another friend has used them exclusively for quite a few years and she buys by the pallet and it lasts her for months and she was bedding about 4 horses and a young weanling at the time. You don't need to bed deep like you do with shavings. I have rubber mats in the stalls. When I bed I put down 2 bags so that is about 8 bucks and it last for weeks if I pick daily and pull from the wall. I don't keep any bedding in the front third of the stall as thats by the door and eating area so I know my horses won't be laying down there. There are quite a few names that pop up if you do an internet search. Most feed stores carry pellets and if you ask I bet they will give you pallet pricing and order yours with theirs and have it waiting for you.
Laurie
Andalusians NW,
Ridgefield, WA
Green+Green=black & blue(treasure the knowledge of an experienced horse)
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#5
There are a few articles on line regarding pellets.

http://www.equilitter.com/comparisons.html

Locally we have Coastal and Wilco Farm stores that offer pellets in their inventory. They are large name stores with many locations. The barn where I board has over 60 stalls so they buy direct and bring in full semi load.
Laurie
Andalusians NW,
Ridgefield, WA
Green+Green=black & blue(treasure the knowledge of an experienced horse)
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#6
One thing to be careful of with wood shaving for horse bedding is to make sure you stay away from hardwoods. Black walnut is toxic to horses if ingested. Oak is another one, and I wouldn't be surprised if there are others. Softwoods are much safer when it comes to bedding horses with wood shavings.

I might add that though sawdust does work, I feel that shavings makes a much better bedding than sawdust. JMHO

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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#7

At the barn where I board they have used wood shavings for years. At some point in the last year they switched to rice hulls for bedding. It is really quite good as far as I can tell. They told me that there was some problem getting the shavings at a decent price and thus the switch. However, I do see shaving again at the barn, so I guess they solved their problem.
A good rider has a thinking mind, fine emotions and a sensitive hand.-Tu Yu,72 BC

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#8
Our horses are outside 24/7 in the summer, but in the winter we bring them in at night (don't know why we do it that way... just habit I guess!) We used to use straw, then sawdust, now we're using the pellets and we like that. Easy to handle, break down nicely, don't pack down like sawdust, easy to sift through, and absorbent. We've used Woody Pet brand and a couple of others including a locally manufactured and bagged brand. It is a little more expensive to use the pellets vs. sawdust, but I think it's worth it. Our trainer, who keeps about thirty-some stalls uses a combination of sawdust and pellets to make it more economical.
"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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#9
quote:
Originally posted by ILoveJoe

My horses currently are NOT stalled, but before I did use the bagged pine shavings. ALOT of waste there. I don't know if I will try the pelleted bedding once we get stalls finished or not. I know folks that use the pelleted bedding and swear by it, and others that switched to it and switched back to shavings because of cost. (Their reason)

Now the woman I had been taking lessons from uses pelleted bedding and she was using the stuff for wood stoves! Anyone ever hear if there is a difference between them and the bedding pellets?





I am totally, totally in love with the pellets. I use "Woody Pet." Once they break down, first of all they triple in volume (I think way more than that). They look and feel like dirt, but I think they're made of condensed pine wood. I have ZERO waste because (and your horse MIGHT make the same choice), Cloud much prefers to piddle in shavings because there is "some" splatter effect on the "dirt" that the pellets create. So I use shavings in one area, and sure enough, that's where she piddles. I use the pellets elsewhere, and she never piddles there. (She will poop there though. But when you fork out the poop, the pellet product falls right through the tines, so there's pretty much zero waste.

Nothing hurts to try that setup, because for me, it's max convenience. I have the same pellet product down that I laid in months ago. I just add to it from time to time. In her piddle spots, I get rid of just that much shavings (all in one area) and replace it.

Highly recommend the pelleted stuff. I also don't wet it down when I add new. Just the humidity in the air and horses walking on it will break it down. GREAT stuff!!!
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#10
We've been using wood shavings most of the time. When it gets really cold (Jan - Mar) we use straw because it's warmer. The straw will trap and hold body heat better.

I like the idea of these pellets and keeping shavings in an area for peeing. I'm going to give that a try.
Beth
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