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Mustang Trim/Natural Trim vs Traditional Trim
#41
The M30 is suppose to be great stuff ... I woudl go with that before the oats ... the safe choice is actually lower in sugars adn starches then the oats...

DE has no backing and has actually been proven NOT TO work... I will have to dig for that info again ...
Peggy Sue
Zan Parrs Dry Doc(Sassy)
Dark River Music(Lazy)
BA Flying Leo(Moosa)
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#42
Thanks for the photos. It's always nice to see the before and after trims.

Looks like a pretty traditional conservative barefoot trim but not the Natural Horse Trim as illustrated in Pete Ramey's book. Is she AANHCP certified? It will be interesting to see how the hooves progress with her trimming style.

Did she explain why she used sandpaper on the exterior hoof walls? Not a common practise or one I am familiar with.

Good idea to limit pasture time and as for grains I am in favour of a ration balancer. Might be a good idea to consult with one of the Ration balancer nutritionists ( such as LLRanch)to get some professional advice.



Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#43
quote:
Originally posted by Hook

Thanks for the photos. It's always nice to see the before and after trims.

Looks like a pretty traditional conservative barefoot trim but not the Natural Horse Trim as illustrated in Pete Ramey's book. Is she AANHCP certified? It will be interesting to see how the hooves progress with her trimming style.

Did she explain why she used sandpaper on the exterior hoof walls? Not a common practise or one I am familiar with.

Good idea to limit pasture time and as for grains I am in favour of a ration balancer. Might be a good idea to consult with one of the Ration balancer nutritionists ( such as LLRanch)to get some professional advice.




She is certified with AANHCP and is a level 5 clinician.
http://www.naturalhooftrim.net/index.html

I got the impression that the trim seen in the books isn't going to happen in the first trimming, at least with my horses. She is working on correcting and strengthening Joe's feet right now. There were alot of times she had to stop and she explained why and showed me the issues where trimming more agressively would have made Joe a very sore boy.

The sandpaper is used to stimulate growth. That is not mentioned in the book. Apparantly since the last publication the finishing method may have been tweaked a bit. Here is another Certified Practioner's website and his list of tools needed for his clinics include sandpaper.
http://www.hooftrack.com/Clinics.html

She has Joe and Rocky on a 5 week trimming schedule and eventually will be on a 6 week schedule.

I am anxious to see how this progresses.


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#44
Thanks for the links and info.

It will be neat to see how Joe and Rocky progress under her care.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#45
I started the boys on rolled oats and will be adding flax seed and the black oil sunflowers. It is nice to see that the oats have slowed Joe down when cleaning up his feed. Usually he bolted the Safe Choice, then moseyed over to finish Rocky's. They are now finishing at the same time.

I will get some photos tomorrow, I noticed today that the profile of Joe's feet are totally different than before, I had focused on the close up of the hooves and the inside, but I can certainly tell a big difference in the shape when viewed from the side.

While bush hogging today I reflected on some things and it occurred to me that it was Joes RB foot that had live sole exposed and when the front was being trimmed by the former farrier, Joe had tried his best to get his back feet up under himself and off those back toes.

This is definetly a learning experience!
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#46
quote:
Originally posted by ILoveJoe

I started the boys on rolled oats and will be adding flax seed and the black oil sunflowers. It is nice to see that the oats have slowed Joe down when cleaning up his feed. Usually he bolted the Safe Choice, then moseyed over to finish Rocky's. They are now finishing at the same time.

I will get some photos tomorrow, I noticed today that the profile of Joe's feet are totally different than before, I had focused on the close up of the hooves and the inside, but I can certainly tell a big difference in the shape when viewed from the side.

While bush hogging today I reflected on some things and it occurred to me that it was Joes RB foot that had live sole exposed and when the front was being trimmed by the former farrier, Joe had tried his best to get his back feet up under himself and off those back toes.

This is definetly a learning experience!



Hi ILJ.

I guess I missed the logic behind switching Joe to a high carbohydrate grain like oats. I thought he had a weight problem and was possibly insulin resistant. Most folks would not recommend the addition of oats for horses in that situation. IMO a ration balancer which gives the balanced nutrition with out the calories and carbohydrates would be a much better choice.

Locking forward to the profile shots.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#47
I couldn't get very good pictures yesterday, Joe kept stalking me and tying him up didn't give me enough light, so here we go for now.

It is pretty apparant to me that the flares on the front feet are lessened and the shape of the RF is looking more like I had imagined they would. The back feet really didn't change much due to the exposed sole.

RF in July:

[Image: DSC_0002.jpg]

RF Oct 15th:
[Image: DSC_0019-1.jpg]

Joe/Rocky July:

[Image: DSC_0029.jpg]

Joe/Rocky Oct 15th:

[Image: joeandrockyoct15.jpg]

I have a call to my farrier about the oats vs safe choice... I have to admit I am really bad with absorbing verbal details. I tend to watch lips move and start thinking about something else. I like to take my husband along with me whenever I NEED to remember what is being told to me...ie dr's visits. [:I] But the diet change applied to Rocky as well as Joe.

I really liked the Safe Choice and as expensive as THAT was, the oats are more per 50 pound bag....add to that all the extras. WHEW! The Red-Cal the farrier uses is OMG expensive! Hubby us already complaining about the additional costs of this new farrier.

I also should state that the quantity of feed/oats the horses get is about 80oz. I use grain more along the lines of a treat when getting them to come in off the pasture. I started adding a handful of BOSS and a small amount of loose minerals. The feed store is out of Flax seed, but I definetly want to get them on the flax seed no matter what type of feed I end up giving.

As far as insulin resistance, Joe has not been tested and it has never been mentioned to me until you did. I have done some googling of it today and it seems a pretty prevalent issue in horses today and Joe certainly fits some of the criteria.

The education coninues....
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#48
Looks like the new trim is holding up well.

We think of the ration balancer as a vitamin/ mineral supplement that compliments the rest of our feed program, eliminating other grains and only requires two pounds per day.

We also feed free choice loose salt and loose mineral formulated for the grass or alfalfa hay we are feeding. Works well for us.

We like the reduced feed costs and how it also seems to cut down the vet bills and optimized their immune system and overall health including hoof structure. No other supplements or additive are required for our guys.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#49
Again, I have to say THANK YOU DEers! This thread really helped kick me into action about non-traditional hoof care.

We found a woman in our area who is... amazing. Just ... amazing. She calls herself a "holistic trimmer" rather than "natural trim specialist". She has all the certs - AANHCP etc., but is more than a farrier/trimmer; she knows equine physiology inside and out. Came today ... I learned more from her in an hour than I have in all the hours spent in the barn with all other farriers combined.

The bad news: Seven's trim has been exactly what he doesn't need; it looks okay from a traditional standpoint but it's been exacerbating his conformational quirks (cowhockedness, righthandedness, elongated narrow feet etc). She put a trim on him that looks a lot like what I've seen of Ramey's photos - took the hoof walls almost off the ground, put the weight back on the sole, pillars and heels (I might be confusing terminology there), gave the toes a little more breakover.

Anyhow, the GOOD news is that she is certain that he'll never (barring another injury) need to wear shoes ever again. The relief is ... profound.
"There is something about the outside of a horse...that is good for the inside of a man." ~Winston Churchill~
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#50
quote:
Originally posted by Arenadirt

Again, I have to say THANK YOU DEers! This thread really helped kick me into action about non-traditional hoof care.

We found a woman in our area who is... amazing. Just ... amazing. She calls herself a "holistic trimmer" rather than "natural trim specialist". She has all the certs - AANHCP etc., but is more than a farrier/trimmer; she knows equine physiology inside and out. Came today ... I learned more from her in an hour than I have in all the hours spent in the barn with all other farriers combined.

The bad news: Seven's trim has been exactly what he doesn't need; it looks okay from a traditional standpoint but it's been exacerbating his conformational quirks (cowhockedness, righthandedness, elongated narrow feet etc). She put a trim on him that looks a lot like what I've seen of Ramey's photos - took the hoof walls almost off the ground, put the weight back on the sole, pillars and heels (I might be confusing terminology there), gave the toes a little more breakover.

Anyhow, the GOOD news is that she is certain that he'll never (barring another injury) need to wear shoes ever again. The relief is ... profound.



Congratulations on finding a qualified Barefoot trimmer. It sounds a lot like the trim I have used with good success on our guys for the last year or so. If you could post a picture or two it would add to the knowledge base of the forum.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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