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Mustang Trim/Natural Trim vs Traditional Trim
#21
I found an old topic on Natural hoofcare started by PG. Even though it is from 2006 it still has good info. I wish Termite were on more, I think he could provide some insight.

http://www.dailyequine.com/forums/topic....IC_ID=2805
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#22
quote:
Originally posted by ILoveJoe

I found an old topic on Natural hoofcare started by PG. Even though it is from 2006 it still has good info. I wish Termite were on more, I think he could provide some insight.

http://www.dailyequine.com/forums/topic....IC_ID=2805



A very good link too. Interesting how my views on barefoot trim have changed since 2006. The main difference is the realization that the hoof wall is really not the main support structure of the foot.

I am now using the natural trim patterned after the method outlined in Pete Ramey's book and am very pleased at the result.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#23
I am deep into Pete Rameys book after finishing Jaime Jacksons very technical read.

In Pete Rameys book he states "that the when the heel gets high, the coffin bone is standing on it's sharp pointed tip rather than having it's solar surface parellel to the ground(or close to it) as nature intended." Did that causes some restless nights on my part!

Here are some photos of before and after the trim on the 27th. Their last trim was July 16th.

Joe Aug 19th:

[Image: DSC_0011.jpg]

Right Back:

[Image: DSC_0013-1.jpg]

[Image: DSC_0008-1.jpg]

Left Back:

[Image: DSC_0014-1.jpg]

[Image: DSC_0006.jpg]

Front:

[Image: DSC_0003b.jpg]

Right Front:
[Image: DSC_0015.jpg]

Currently both of Joes back feet are wedge shaped, more so the LEFT.
After trim photos.

Left Back:

[Image: DSC_0008-2.jpg]

[Image: DSC_0012-2.jpg]

[Image: DSC_0015-1.jpg]

[Image: DSC_0014-2.jpg]

[Image: DSC_0010-1.jpg]

[Image: DSC_0009-1.jpg]

Left Front:

[Image: DSC_0007-2.jpg]

Right Front:

[Image: DSC_0013-2.jpg]






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#24
Candace, in my limited experience, I have discovered that all horses feet are different. Some will chip and crack much more than others, and grow at different rates, all within the same herd on the same feed and pasture. Also, a horse with faster growing hooves and a heavier build will likely chip out more than another. From the pictures, I would tend to agree with the farrier that these look like chips caused by a lot of fly stomping. Unfortunately, the season of fastest hoof growth comes at the same time as the peak season for flies.
quote:
Originally posted by ILoveJoe

My horses have never had shoes on their feet and never will.

While I agree that barefoot is best for many horses, I don't think I would make a blanket statement like that. Some horses in some situations can benefit from shoes. It's best to keep an open mind and, if it appears that your horse could benefit from shoes, or if you plan to go on a ride where shoes might help them (rocks, etc), they should be considered.
"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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#25
[This is farmgirl
I readed the page Mustang Trim i am going to ask my shoer if he does this or knows what i am talking about!
Thankyou! Interesting !b][/b]
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#26
I don't like the trim at all. I suggest that it may be in Joe's best interest to get the Natural Trim Guy over as soon as it can be arranged.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#27
quote:
Originally posted by Hook

I don't like the trim at all. I suggest that it may be in Joe's best interest to get the Natural Trim Guy over as soon as it can be arranged.



That being said I would like to add that Joe will need to be trimmed more often than every 6 weeks to get those chips under control. Ramsey suggested that every 4 weeks is required to get the best advantage from the natural trim.

Your farrier has not done a a bad job considering the condition of Joe's hooves, he has left lots of sole and from your photos the angles look okay, but I think that Joe can benefit from a Natural style trim.

I don't see any evidence of founder and Joe's soles look pretty normal and healthy. He should not be sensitive or lame on those feet.

The other thing that I would recommend is that you read the posts regarding ration balancers and consider using it for your guys. Ideally you should talk to an equine nutritionist who will recommend some tests on your hay and help you with a diet that will promote healthier hooves ( and overall health) for both of your guys. Most farriers and a lot of vets will not have the same level of knowledge as a trained equine nutritionist.

And Harv is right, the feet of different horses in the same conditions have different looking feet. My addition would be that different horses have different nutritional needs that sometimes require different diets to optimize their health.

I also agree with Harv that there are some conditions where shoeing is a must for the health of the horse.

You might also invest in a pair of hoof boots like Old Macs so you can take Joe on the ride.

Good luck and let us know how things end up.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#28
If there is concern that the foot has internal construction issues your vet should be brought into the discussion and if indicated x-rays should be taken and discuss the best option for the horse. Maybe the vet, the owner and whichever farrier involved in current or future foot care can all meet, review the views and establish the best course of treatment/trimming. A team approach would be in the best interest of the horse. You will have your known objectives and can measure the results. Possibly bloodwork is indicated. Step back and look at the bigger picture.
Laurie
Andalusians NW,
Ridgefield, WA
Green+Green=black & blue(treasure the knowledge of an experienced horse)
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#29
quote:
Originally posted by andalusn

If there is concern that the foot has internal construction issues your vet should be brought into the discussion and if indicated x-rays should be taken and discuss the best option for the horse. Maybe the vet, the owner and whichever farrier involved in current or future foot care can all meet, review the views and establish the best course of treatment/trimming. A team approach would be in the best interest of the horse. You will have your known objectives and can measure the results. Possibly bloodwork is indicated. Step back and look at the bigger picture.



Good Idea.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#30
ILoveJoe

Like Hook said you need a new farrier. When you keep a horse barefoot his feet has to get conditioned to the type of ground you ride him on. Just like when I was a kid, the last day of school the shoes came off and walking on grass was okay but on gravel it hurt for a couple of weeks till my feet toughened up. If Joe is always on sod he will be ouchy when he walks on stoney ground.

Termite
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