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Mustang Trim/Natural Trim vs Traditional Trim
#11
quote:
Originally posted by horsehugger2000

You may want to ease him into it unknowingly by adding a mustang roll to the toe and sides. That may help chipping. Shoot you can even do that yourself. Check out the site and see how they do it. I personally think this keeps the trim from chipping a bit longer. As far as flares, you yourself can easily keep that in check with a bit of filing once a week or so. Again look at the how to trim section. You're not going to hurt them with a bit of rasping so go for it!!!!



Wendi is right. The tools are simple, Hoof pick, Hoof knife, Rasp and Nippers and you have all the tools you need to do it all yourself. Read the information keep the time between trims very short and listen to the foot. Keep it simple. Buy Pete Ramay's book. Has some very good "how to" pictures there.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#12
My 3 Mustangs have always been barefoot, but I'm having shoes put on Brownie, one of my geldings, because of cracking and some very rocky trails I'm taking him on now. Mustangs have hard hooves from running on rocky ground. That is pretty much taken away from them where I am now on just soft dirt. They are all cracking and chipping but have been helped by applying an oil product to the hooves (forgot the name of it. I also started them on a Biotin supplement, but Merry had yet to become fond of the taste. Brownie is 8 years old and will get his first shoes just on front next week. I've limited riding him on these trails as he was really having trouble on a particularly rocky one last week. I know he will be very glad to get back out there and do more of the exploring he enjoys so much.
Linda
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#13
My friend and her husband are both ecstatic over this new farrier.

This farrier spent an hour on each horse this first visit then 45 minutes after answering questions.

Muffin will get trimmed every 4 weeks, Tucker and Poco will be on the 6 week trim. Tucker has an issue with one foot being unusually larger then the other and she is going to address that issue as well.

Eventually they will all be on the 6 week schedule.

Muffin couldn't walk out of her stall without Easy Boots on and today was prancing with out them!

I don't have good pictures because I didn't get to go, I stayed home and put up 80 bales of hay off my pasture. *YAY*

My friend took these pictures with her digital camera, then took pictures of THEM using her phone to send to me. SO they are pretty crummy.

Here is Muffin Before:

[Image: MuffinBefore.jpg]


And Muffin After:

[Image: MuffinAfter.jpg]

I don't know if that is the same foot or from a different side or not. I'll try to get better pictures. She and her hubby went today and bought both Ramey's and Jacksons books.

I am going to follow this horses progress before I make a decision about switching. But I probably will. Even Hubby was not very happy that the chips and cracks were still so obvious. And I really don't like that flare on Joe's front feet. I really like my guy butI don't like the chipping and cracking 4 weeks later. Tough decision ahead.
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#14
quote:
Originally posted by ILoveJoe

My friend and her husband are both ecstatic over this new farrier.

This farrier spent an hour on each horse this first visit then 45 minutes after answering questions.


Muffin couldn't walk out of her stall without Easy Boots on and today was prancing with out them!

.......

She and her hubby went today and bought both Ramey's and Jacksons books.




Now that is good news and the change in a horse with Laminitus seems consistent with Ramey's book.

I assume the AANHCP farrier also recommended some diet changes for Muffin.

Thanks for keeping us informed. Looking forward to the better pictures.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#15
My friends have read both Jackson and Ramey's books, I have not yet. My friend is telling me that the natural horsemanship care in these books basically dictates that horses should never be out on grass. Only dry lots and grass hay. No clover, alfalfa etc. She said this applies to all horses, more strictly so in foundered ones or laminitic ones.
Anyone else read these books and have gotten that same message?


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#16
A couple of things I noticed when viewing the first pictures....the Joe LF one does look like your farrier is putting a "mustang" roll on the edge of the hoof wall (notice the left side of the picture, you can see an almost 45 degree angle) or commonly called the "Mustang Roll". This is done for horses who will stay barefoot the majority of the time. I believe your current farrier is doing a good job for your horses based on what I can see in the first set of pictures. The "flare" that you appear to be concerned with may well be the way your horses foot grows. Be careful of trimming too much of the outer wall away with a rasp as it will only weaken it more. It's difficult to "judge" from pictures without actually seeing the horse but it appears to be a competant job to me. Since being out of school I have been apprenticing with a man here in Hot Springs that has been shoeing for over 30+ years and have learned an awful lot in a short time. I am by no means an expert but knowledge is "power" and IMO it would be beneficial to every horse owner to learn all they can about the why's and how's of farrier work.
The "natural trim" has it's benefits but I agree that a "good trim" by a competant farrier is worth equal merit. Dry, brittle feet or feet that have wall separation due to "thrush" or "seedy toe" are more prone to chipping off due to the weakened wall as well as just plain ole' fly stomping that can cause even a horse with a recent trim to "break off" hoof wall. Most commonly in the "quarter" of the foot. Shoes protect the walls of the hoof but equally the nails used to hold the shoe on can become loosened by constant pawing/stomping so can be the cause of chipped walls where the nails tear away. The right "recipe" for each horse is different. It's a balance of nutrition, environment and maintenance or like "Hook" said!

There is a ton of information out there to learn about...pros and cons to "natural trim vs. shoes vs. barefoot. Each hoof is individual in it's confirmation and needs to be cared for accordingly. I'm an advocate for barefoot horses but shoes can prevent damage in many cases and do help many a horse perform to it's best capability. My "mentor" suggests that those horses who's owners want to keep them shod do allow at least a 2 month period during the year to go barefoot. He also suggests that due to the living environment of the horse, keeping some horses shod is essential to keeping them ridable.

In short: don't discount your current farrier's work in favor of a new method until that method is proven to work on YOUR horse! It's different for each horse even when kept in the same environment!

There is another site that I often visit to "see"/"learn" from as well as "learn" about new ideas in the farrier world! It has become a daily ritual to visit the DE site and the following one to arm myself with more and more knowledge about the world of horses!
http://horseshoes.com/forums/

BTW: have "clog" shoes ever been tried on Muffin (the laminitic mare)?

Just my 2 cents worth!
Dixieme
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#17
Dixieme, I doubt if they tried Clog shoes on Muffin. Apparantly Muffin's lameness came back with a vengence a few days after her trim by this natural hoofcare lady and she was back to being turned out in her Easy Boots.

I have adopted a wait and see approach as far as changing farriers. I really like my farrier, he is EXTREMELY reliable and competent. I just have those few concerns about the chipping and flaring.

I was hoping to have read these books for myself before his next visit on the 27th so I can ask informed questions.

As far as the mustang roll on Joe's LF, I'll have to take your word for it, cause I don't see it. [Smile] That is the foot with the pronounced flare. When I first bought Joe his feet were very flared and slightly ridged. I started him on Hoof and Mane supplement and after about 3 months the new growth was very easy to detect because it was very smooth. It has just been within the past year that the flare has begun to reappear and only in the front.

I have noticed Joe hitting and I have mentioned that to the farrier for the past year and he will say "I'll have to speed him up". I am not sure what that means, I will make it a point to ask.

Since Joe and Rocky won't be ridden heavily for another year or so, it isn't a real big deal. BUT, if we were trail riding most weekends like our goal for the future is, then this would be an issue. Joe's feet are already a cracked up mess.

I really appreciate the input and the link to the farrier forum, Ahhhh another forum![Big Grin]



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#18
An Update on Muffin. SHe is doing very well. The soreness after the first trim is almost completely gone. I went and saw her feet last week and my gosh her hooves look great. She is still being turned out in boots, but her hooves are starting to develop the normal inward curve, instead of her feet being flat.

We forgot to take the camera, we were out relocating a raccoon and only got to visit for just a short time before dark.

Joe and Rocky are being trimmed on the 27th, I will post photos of their before and afters. I am also reading Jaime Jacksons book and hope to have both his and Pete Rameys finished before my farrier comes out so I can discuss what I am wanting for my horses feet. Their feet are a mess right now and Joe's started falling apart two weeks after the last trim.[Sad]
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#19
I should also mention from what I have read so far, I think the mustang roll on my horses feet would go a long way in keep the chipping and flaring down. The feet on Poco my friends other horse looked alot like Joe's trim.

SO I think my farrier is doing a good job, but I think we can improve a bit.
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#20
ILJ, that is exactly the way it is with my 18 year old mare, Butterbaby. Two weeks after she's been trimmed, she looks like she hasn't seen a farrier in years! The funny thing is, her feet are actually very hard, but they grow quite fast; I suspect that if I could get someone out once a week to trim her, there would be no problems. But I can't find anyone willing to come out that often for just one horse (the other two do fine on a 5 to 6 week schedule).

WAAAAY back when I lived in Colorado, the farriers I used all did what looks just like the natural trim. They didn't call it that...they didn't call it anything, actually. It was just the way they did it. The result was a very hard, chip-free hoof. I remember being rather shocked when I moved here to Indiana, and none of the farriers were trimming that way. They just trimmed the hoof flat & rasped off the sharp edges a little. At the time, I thought, "Gee, won't those hooves chip a lot?" Yup! Since then, it has been 32 years of chips and cracks...

EZ2SPOT
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