Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Weight Gain & Riding Skills
#1
I'm recently back to owning horses and riding after a loooong 40 years without horses. In the 60's I was an excellent rider doing gymkhanas, reining, bareback obstacle races, swimming my horse, etc. Fast forward 40 years and 70 pounds, I adopt a green-broke Mustang and get into the saddle, with all the confidence I used to have that I was still an advance rider. Wrong! I was shocked how out of balance I was. It was bareback on a winter coat, but I could barely stay on at a walk! I haven't ridden bareback since, only in the saddle. Walking is fine, as is a slow jog, but trying to post I was completely out of sync with the horse, clumsy and a little off balance. A sitting trot was such an embarassement that I declined to join our local drill team like I'd planned. Anyway, I'm getting better with time, but is this all due to the weight? Do we really lose the ability to ride over 40 years? Would an exercise ball help retrain my balance? Could it be that I was just used to a very well trained gymkhana horse in contrast to a green Mustang? Whatever it takes, I'll do it and I continue to ride at least twice a week even in the snow and 20's temps. Although I'm improving, I just wonder if I can ever get back to the rider I used to be. I'd love to hear from anyone with ideas & suggestions. Thanks!
Reply
#2
You can and will get back to your former glory!I do notice that the extra lbs make it harder to do things but have worked around it for the most part.My balance is the only thing that is still not up to par but for the most part I stay in the saddle!
BethAnn
BethAnn Stewart
Palmyra,Indiana

Lovie-gypsy vanner
Lad- Clydesdale


Do not take up the warpath without a just cause and honest purpose. Pushmataha-Choctow leader
Reply
#3
LindaOz, this is exactly my problem! It's why I'm the president of GTA. A combination of weight and age is the culprit. The age makes the balance and muscle strength less, and the extra weight moves your center of gravity up higher, making you top-heavy. Throw in Newton's Law of Inertia, and you've got a tough adversary.
"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


Reply
#4
quote:
Originally posted by BethAnn

You can and will get back to your former glory!I do notice that the extra lbs make it harder to do things but have worked around it for the most part.My balance is the only thing that is still not up to par but for the most part I stay in the saddle!
BethAnn



BethAnn,

Thanks for your input. I wonder if riding in a round pen with eyes closed with arms stretched out might help get the balance back...if it is still out there somewhere [cornfused. I've seen this done on some training shows, but ignored it as I ... well... didn't think it pertained to me. [baghead] ha ha.

Good luck to you with regaining your balance. Sounds like you are doing fine.

Linda
Reply
#5
quote:
Originally posted by hmeyer

LindaOz, this is exactly my problem! It's why I'm the president of GTA. A combination of weight and age is the culprit. The age makes the balance and muscle strength less, and the extra weight moves your center of gravity up higher, making you top-heavy. Throw in Newton's Law of Inertia, and you've got a tough adversary.




Harv,
Well, at least we've progressed in one area: We are more acutely aware of Newton's Law of Inertia! [:O] Never noticed it much before. Usually I'm pretty good with acronyms, but could you tell me what GTA stands for?
Linda
Reply
#6
I read once to just stand with your eyes shut. When you are OK with that stand on one foot as long a you can /then the other/ then close your eyes. I'm up to 45 sec. but eyes are open.
Jill
Life is too short to ride bad horses.
Reply
#7
An exercise ball really helps with the balance. Just sit on it, pick your feet off the floor, and balance. When you are starting out make sure the couch is behind you so you don't tip over backwards. Better yet put your helmet on first before mounting up.

We watched Stacey Westfall do a clinic last year and that was one of her suggestions.

Then when you get good at balancing, lay with your legs on top of the ball and do pushups.

When you are riding, posting correctly really helps with the balance. Then, when you get a bit stronger drop your stirrups and keep posting. The pounds will just drop off - either that or your legs will. [}Smile][Tongue]
Reply
#8
I just read a very interesting book;

Good Calories, Bad Calories: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Diet, Weight Control, and Disease (Hardcover)
by Gary Taubes (Author)


It really does challenge conventional doctrine about weight loss and diets.

It basically recommends elimination of sugar and refined carbohydrates because they stimulate excessive insulin production which tells the body to store fat. Incorporating more fat in your diet actually results in the reduction of fat cells regardless of calorie intake.

I ( we) were so impressed we have been trying it and it is resulting in a reduction in fat with a corresponding gradual reduction in weight. So Far so good.

I have to buy another because I gave my copy to our favourite nutritional doctor.

A bit technical to read but well worthwhile to shake up your common (mis)conceptions about weight loss and dieting and what your body needs to be healthy from a fact based new perspective.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
Reply
#9
quote:
Originally posted by Parrothead

I read once to just stand with your eyes shut. When you are OK with that stand on one foot as long a you can /then the other/ then close your eyes. I'm up to 45 sec. but eyes are open.



Jill,
45 min. on one leg is pretty good! I could do over 2 min on both feet, but on just one I lasted a couple of seconds. Thanks for the suggestion. I can see how it would help develop balance.
Linda
Reply
#10
quote:
Originally posted by Mrs Hook

An exercise ball really helps with the balance. Just sit on it, pick your feet off the floor, and balance. When you are starting out make sure the couch is behind you so you don't tip over backwards. Better yet put your helmet on first before mounting up.

We watched Stacey Westfall do a clinic last year and that was one of her suggestions.

Then when you get good at balancing, lay with your legs on top of the ball and do pushups.

When you are riding, posting correctly really helps with the balance. Then, when you get a bit stronger drop your stirrups and keep posting. The pounds will just drop off - either that or your legs will. [}Smile][Tongue]



I had to laugh about using my helmet on the exercise ball, but it certainly would be a good idea. Ha ha. I've got posting down now, for which my horse is very grateful. I honestly don't think I will be releasing the stirrups to post for a loooong time though. I appreciate the info. Thanks!
Linda
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)