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#11
My horses are in the barn at night, but not for human-related security reasons. I usually have an older horse or two here, and the one has beginning signs of cataracts. He does not appear to feel secure enough to lay down at night if he is outside. The other reason that my horses are in the barn at night is predators. While the largest predetors that we have are coyotes, they WILL run the horses, or the horses will run THEM. I don't want to go out some morning and find that the horses had been run thru the fence.

Bringing them in at night allows for individual feeding and no chance of fighting over feed. Yes, they *could* go back out after feeding, but for the reasons above, I keep them in at that point.
-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"
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#12
Regarding halters:
Colleen, I hope this doesn't offend you, but these pictures really showed me how badly a horse can get hurt on the most innocent of things. I never leave a halter on my unattended horse after seeing these. These pictures are graphic and were posted by a lady who's horse survived. This is her explanation of what she thinks happened.
My apologies to anyone who is offended.


I just wanted to show you all a picture of my filly...and what happens when you
leave halters on horses. I had been halter breaking her and was letting her drag
her lead around. She must have been scratching her head on the water hydrant and
got it caught. Pulled the hydrant out of the ground, breaking her nose, then
somehow got free of the hydrant and came down on it, impaling herself in the chest.
That cost me about $1000 but she's okay now. Just hoping you all can benefit from
my mistake!

Photobucket has deleted the images which doesn't surprise me since they were pretty graphic.
[Image: sugaraccident1.jpg]
[Image: sugaraccident3.jpg]
Nancy (and Tag & Rocky)
Free & easy down the trail I go......
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#13
OMG the poor thing, glad to hear he's better now. That was awful to see but it sure shows what can happen, my son recently rescued a horse with its foot caught in a fence it was pulling so hard to get out too. I don't even keep collars on my dogs, they hang at the front door for when we are ready to go out for a walk. I hear they make something called a break away halter, not sure how that works. Thanks for sharing that it will stay in my mind for sure.
Colleen who hopes to have a horse soon.

The air of heaven is that which blows between a horse's ears -- Arabian proverb

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#14
Speechless.

Glad you posted them though.
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#15
quote:
Originally posted by Colleen

OMG the poor thing, glad to hear he's better now. That was awful to see but it sure shows what can happen, my son recently rescued a horse with its foot caught in a fence it was pulling so hard to get out too. I don't even keep collars on my dogs, they hang at the front door for when we are ready to go out for a walk. I hear they make something called a break away halter, not sure how that works. Thanks for sharing that it will stay in my mind for sure.


The breakaway halters I've seen are nylon halters with a leather "breakaway" piece, usually the crown. Chances are, teh nylon will never break, but if what you snag on is tougher than the leather, the leather will break and the halter comes off. Won't do much good if the leather is tougher tahn the plumbing that did this damage.
AE
________________________
I'm so busy, I'm not sure if I found a rope or lost my horse.
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#16
AE, I have been wondering aboat that. The tabs on the breakaway halters do seem strong enough that some damage to the horse would probably be done, before the leather would give away. The safest thing is NO halter.

EZ2SPOT
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#17
I am with you EZ. Halters are for handling or tying horses.

We never turn them out with the halters on or for that matter they don't wear halters in the stall either.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#18
I agree - NO halters except when you have the horse on lead. Not only is it dangerous to leave a halter on an unattended horse, it's also not fair to the horse to ask him to stand around all day with junk hanging off his face.

If you think you need to have a halter on him in order to catch him, that's an indication that there's training work to be done.
"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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#19
quote:
Originally posted by EZ2SPOT

AE, I have been wondering aboat that. The tabs on the breakaway halters do seem strong enough that some damage to the horse would probably be done, before the leather would give away. The safest thing is NO halter.

EZ2SPOT


There's tradeoffs on both sides. If you make it weak enough to prevent all harm, then it's not much use as a halter. I prefer leather, but if you must use nylon, then I think a breakaway is better. I just don't see what good can come from putting anything like nylon on a horse that NEVER breaks. Everything should break at some point - it won't prevent everything, but it could save some.
AE
________________________
I'm so busy, I'm not sure if I found a rope or lost my horse.
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#20
Mine all go halter-less, unless being handled or on a highline when camping. Stall or paddock, they are naked.

I also agree with hmyer on the more training needed comment.
When rescue arab shyla arrived, she spent a few weeks with a halter on, untill it was no longer needed. She had been abused, and had major issues with anything being taken off, or put on her head.
She also wanted to move away from you, till she learned this was a friendly place/people.

So, for her, I did leave the halter on, but even that made me nervous. She no longer ever has one on, unless being handled. (she got the training needed)
Ride safe, return safe.

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