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Head lowering
#11
Normally people are taught to stand to one side more towards the hip but you have to cross behind at sometimes and I think it's a good thing to teach the horse to get use to that. I have no problem standing behind my own horses, the ones I have had for a long time and know how they react. Sometimes you just need to be in that area to do grooming, clipping, doctoring, tacking up. For saddle fit photos some only come out if you take them from behind or above and behind the horse. If the camera doesn't have a good zoom you have to be closer. I do not think that standing on a step stool right behind a horse is a good idea and I have only done that on horses like Jazz. I'm short and sometimes on drafts or even a horse that is over 16hhs I need a step stool to do somethings. Even on the shorty ones like Jazz I use them for braiding/banding manes. So mine learn to put up with a step stool and mounting blocks every where around them. Heck you should of seen me trying to harness up a draft horse that was well over my head and no step stool! Poor Bart, not only did I not really know what I was doing with the harness but he wasn't use to someone so short trying to harness him up. His owner was tacking up Curt(yes Burt and Curt lol I love there names) and was laughing his butt off at me so he was not a lot of help in explaining how to harness up a horse. It was a good thing I had a basic idea and found a tool box to stand on...Burt was still over my head.
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#12
I guess I should've explained myself more clearly[Smile].

When I stand off to the side of my horse near his rear, I am usually right beside his hip. I'm sure you know this, Annie, but when you stand up close to the horse, he can't get as much force into a potential kick. I think this is exactly what you were saying when standing close up to behind the horse. Still, to me at least, it seems that a horse could get more force put into a kick straight back than one to the side. I guess it all boils down to how we were taught when learning about horses[Smile].

I'm not trying to cause a debate on this issue but just trying to point out that my method is a safe way to do it, too. I had just never heard that it was ever safe to stand directly behind a horse for any length of time except for when you have to go around the horse to get to the other side. Like Stormie, I would trust either of my two horses when it comes to standing behind them, and I've done it many times. But I sure wouldn't do it with a horse that I don't know[Smile][Wink].
"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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#13
We used to have to spend HOURS behind horses. If you've ever seen what goes into a show tail set - OY!! and most of it had to be directly behind or things would be crooked. : )

But you're right in that you are standing close (within an arm's length). I was taught to never APPROACH a horse directly from the rear, or if you had too -like in the old side by side trailers or in a tie stall- you made noise and made sure the horse knew you were there.

Crossing behind you cross close or far but never in kicking impact range ( about 3-4 ft ).
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#14
quote:
Originally posted by Annie Oakley

We used to have to spend HOURS behind horses. If you've ever seen what goes into a show tail set - OY!! and most of it had to be directly behind or things would be crooked. : )

But you're right in that you are standing close (within an arm's length). I was taught to never APPROACH a horse directly from the rear, or if you had too -like in the old side by side trailers or in a tie stall- you made noise and made sure the horse knew you were there.

Crossing behind you cross close or far but never in kicking impact range ( about 3-4 ft ).



If you are talking about putting in a hunter braid, I know exactly what you are talking about. I showed horses for over 30 years, and I know it takes quite awhile to get that tail ready for the show ring. I'm just so glad that I don't have to do that anymore. Even just getting all the tangles out of a tail can take an hour or more, sometimes. LOL!

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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#15
I've done hunter braids a couple of times ( I get finger cramps just thinking about it! LOL) but no.. we showed show horses ( Saddlebreds )and a couple of Hackneys so we had to hand comb tails and braid them in pantyhose, then put them in braces a couple of times a week.. For shows we had to hand comb it all out,tie the tail ( and sometimes a fake tail ) and ginger the horses.
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#16
Pepper seems to love having her tail brushed and skritched and fussed with so much, I can't imagine her even thinking about kicking someone who was doing that! Backing them into a corner begging for more, maybe, but not kicking. So I don't worry too much about where I stand; though it's a good idea to keep your eyes on your horse no matter WHERE you're standing.

'plash
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#17
Have you tried pulling her tail? al la TTouch?

Bunny and all my dogs LOVE having their tails pulled ( gently)straight back. Bunny will back up to me in her lot so I scratch her tailhead and pull on her tail. : )
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#18
Yep, I've done that too. The first time I pulled her tail (gently) she swung her head around and gave me an incredulous look like I was totally out of my mind. She doesn't do that any more -- can't tell if she really likes the tail-pulling or not, but she tolerates it. She much prefers the scritches.

But hey, this thread got hijacked -- any progress with your mustang, Linda?

'plash
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