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sit on pockets or not?
#1
When you ride hunt seat, are you suppose to sit on your pockets or you pubic bone? Same question for cantering? I appreciate your patience with my ignorance on this one.
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#2
In order to find the correct position, stand in your stirrups, close the calves of your legs on your horse, drop your heels down, look up and ahead and very slowly let your body sink into the saddle. Don't sit back, just go straight down.

You will be sitting on the inside your thighs and your two seat bones. You maintain that position, whether walk trotting or cantering.

Red Hawk posted a picture of herself not long ago when she introduced herself to a newcomer. Perhaps she would repost because it shows a good sitting position.
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#3
quote:
Originally posted by Mrs Hook

In order to find the correct position, stand in your stirrups, close the calves of your legs on your horse, drop your heels down, look up and ahead and very slowly let your body sink into the saddle. Don't sit back, just go straight down.

You will be sitting on the inside your thighs and your two seat bones. You maintain that position, whether walk trotting or cantering.

Red Hawk posted a picture of herself not long ago when she introduced herself to a newcomer. Perhaps she would repost because it shows a good sitting position.



Is this the one you are referring to? The reason I ask is because my legs are too far forward and not under me where they belong:

[Image: 100_0055.jpg]

Just a quick note: I know I've said it before, but the reason my stirrup length looks so long is because I have bad knees. When I ride for long periods of time, I can't take a lot of bend in my knees without experiencing mild pain and discomfort.
"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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#4
quote:
Is this the one you are referring to? The reason I ask is because my legs are too far forward and not under me where they belong:




Yeah, that's the one. You are sitting on the inside your legs and on your seat bones.

Draw a line down through ear, shoulder, and the hip, they all line up, and that is what Gaitingal should be looking for. You can't get that line unless you are sitting properly.

You had explained previously you ride with extra long stirrups because of your knees. If your stirrups were a notch shorter then the line would extend on down through your heel, because your leg position is basically correct, its just longer and that makes it more forward.

There is no difference in how you sit, either English or Western. Effective riding is effective riding. Specialty events will require longer or shorter stirrups and more extreme body positions but the basic "how to sit" is consistant.
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#5
So where does the old cowpoke saying of "ride your pockets" come from? I've heard it a million times, and never really quite knew what to make of it. It seems to indicate "sit back on your butt"...but you are saying don't sit back on your butt. That makes a lot of sense to me, and is actually the way I ride...if I "ride my pockets" I feel like I'm in an armchair or something and my legs get too far out front. I do sit on my inner legs and seat bones, just because to me it seems more balanced...but then I'm a novice.

So...is the "ride your pockets" just a bunch of old cowboy baloney? I have ALWAYS wondered about this but was kind of afraid to ask...but now somebody else brought it up. Yay!![clap][clap]
Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show
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#6
I always thought when you "sit back on your pockets" you are signalling your horse to slow down or stop, or back up. Maybe there's more to it than that?
"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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#7
If you look at our anatomy, when we are standing our pelvic bones are vertical (or pretty much so), and our vertebrae stack up, one on top of the other to form our backbone. If we sit on the inside of our legs, and on our seat bones, our pelvis stays in the same position as when we are standing and therefore so does our backbone, our body is flexable and strong. A proper riding position is one where if the horse vanished, we would be left standing on the ground and ready to walk off.

If we sit back on our pockets, our legs go ahead and our pelvis tips back, our vertebra are no longer stacked but are at a funny angle. Your body is no longer flexible and able to follow the horses motion. Next look at what happens to your legs, we have a big inside leg muscle and the outside thigh muscle, we don't have a back of the leg muscle to grip with. If a horse jumps you can grab on with that inside leg, but if you are sitting back on your butt, you don't have any effective muscle to grab with, so you then you get to become a member of GTA.

Hmeyer, cueing a horse with weight doesn't mean you change position in the saddle, it just means you shift your weight to a different area. If you look at pictures of sliding stops, they are keeping their bodies in alignment, they shift their weight down and back, and when the horse tucks its butt, they balance by letting their legs flow forward, and the thrust makes them look like they are sitting back but that's because they are relaxed and flowing with the horse. When they come out of the slide and rollback, they need to be on the inside of their legs in order to not be left behind. Same thing with a barrel racer, when that horse sits and turns, they had better be on the inside their legs or they won't be able catch up.

I don't know where the saying "Ride on your Pockets" come from, other that maybe beginners want to crouch over the front of a horse with their backs round and their feet back and up under them. The only other thing I can think of, is cowboys were guys and anatomy - well --- you know. [Big Grin][}Smile]
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#8
quote:
Originally posted by Mrs Hook


Hmeyer, cueing a horse with weight doesn't mean you change position in the saddle, it just means you shift your weight to a different area.

You can't shift your weight without changing your position in some way. That's impossible.
"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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#9
Actually you can but your body does move a little but not so that you are really out of position. Try it where yu are sitting. Sit correctly, back straight, feet flat on the floor(unless you are short like me and can't do that one some chairs, lol Big Grin ) Sit with the weight even. Now drop a little weight into that left butt cheek(if only it was so simple that we could put our weight where we wanted it!) Your body shouldn't move a whole lot. Not so much that you loose that basic position. Drop a little weight back and downward, again your position really does not move that much, not to the point that your position is altered so much that you are out of position.
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#10
This is a great topic i went to a clinic years ago and the instructor kept telling everyone to sit back on your pockets HUH i had no idea what she meant i was thinking about the pockets on my jeans and trying to sit back on em and i think i was getting into a very strange position
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