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My first experience with groundwork/horshmanship
#11
quote:
Originally posted by paintedbliss

I enjoyed your post "hooks niece," very refreshing. Look forward in hearing more adventures with training. It's a good perspective hearing it from the beginners point of view while being taught from an experienced teacher. I think it doesnot matter whether you show, trailride, ect what matters is you share experiences that could possibly help others.




LOL... I learned a few things this weekend about horses - especially horses and Murphy's Law - if there's a foot in the area - a horse will most likely step on it... It's a good thing Flyer's just a little guy or I'd be hurting right now [B)]
Keep Smiling, it makes people wonder what you're up to!
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#12
quote:
Originally posted by Hook

quote:
Originally posted by Red Hawk

I'd just like to say a couple of things:

Most of the advice given on this forum is for everyday use and not totally attuned to the show ring. Also, most of the time, the beginners on this forum usually have horses that have some age on them and have been trained... not still learning as in the case of a 2 year old. A lot of what you are learning is not necessary for the everyday world of horses outside of the show ring. So, a lot of what you are going through, other beginners on this site will not need unless they are planning to show, too.

[^][Wink].



Red Hawk;

Are you suggesting that people who show horses are not welcome on Chuck's Forum ( after all he does sell show saddles)or alternatively that learning the proper way to handle horses on the ground is not a desired practise. I don't think that the Forum is limited to just older trail riding folks and we do have a few folks with horse handling problems.


Hook, that's not the way I took Red Hawk's post at all. I think she just meant that as the reason why, as Hook's Niece said, "however at the same time the advice given is in terms that mostly advanced riders are able to understand so here goes...."
I don't think Red Hawk has anything at all against show people. Sometimes just a little hard to figure out what her meaning is[V][^][Wink]
"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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#13
Like I stated in my very first post; I am glad that Hook's Neice has mentors in her aunt & uncle to help her learn about horses and how to handle them. As can be seen by many members who post on DE, not all beginners have that opportunity and is the reason we try to help them and show them the proper direction in which to go and grow with their horses. HN has good horses to practice with, someone experienced to guide her and be right there with her through the entire process, and it will be a fun and exciting experience. I couldn't be happier for her and wish all beginners were that lucky.

For over 30 years, showing was my whole life. I know how intoxicating it can be. But there are things you do when showing that have no relevance on everyday life with horses. In showmanship; The handler usually stands at attention much like a soldier and every move is crisp and sharp. I don't move like this under normal circumstances around my horses. I'm more relaxed. Every move the horse makes must be exact, too, if the handler expects to be in the ribbons. My horse is a trail horse and an everyday riding horse. I do expect her to move certain ways at certain times when I ask for it, but it doesn't have to be done precisely or accurately every time I ask for it. In western pleasure; The horse is asked to move a certain way in all three gaits. Usually very slowly with the head lowered(not a peanut roller). Personally, I don't want my horses to move like that. I want my horse to cover ground and still give me a smooth ride. That's the whole idea of a horse... a mode of transportation to get from point A to point B in a reasonable amount of time. I have rarely seen this in a western pleasure class.

There are different ways of learning to ride horses. Showing is one of them, but not many people show horses these days. It's very expensive in the upper levels. Traveling any distance to get to the larger shows is costly. Show equipment for judged classes can break the bank let alone having a trainer and a coach. In my area, shows are getting smaller and smaller while trail riding has become the fastest growing equestrain past time in the country. And as can be seen right on this forum, most of us trail ride.

I do have some pet peeves about showing. This is one of many reasons why I quit... another being I can no longer afford it. And it really doesn't matter how a person learns to ride, whether it is for showing, over fence, endurance, reining, cutting, or just getting on a horse a moseying down the trail, as long as the student learns the basics, has the proper guidance, and stays safe. Each method is different and not all techniques for one is necessary for another. That's all.

I'm sorry I stirred up a hornet's nest, but I guess I'm good at that. I always seem to get myself in trouble, but I have strong beliefs and feelings when it comes to horses, and I am very good at speaking my mind. That's just me. I like helping people learn about horses and how to get along with them without being hurt. There's nothing more important to me than making it as easy for beginners and novices to experience this. Horses have been my life, and they will continue to be so as long as I live.

So, I'll just back on out of here and leave you folks alone. My best to each and every one of you.
"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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#14
quote:
Originally posted by Red Hawk

Yes, hmeyer, and I totally agree... and what you have just pointed out was exactly my point[Smile].



Okay RH, you gotta stop confusing poor old Flooper by writing in "opposites language" (stop really means go, run really means walk!!)...I read your post, and then I read hmeyer's post and I thought you guys TOTALLY DISAGREED, not totally agreed!![Big Grin][confused]


Hook's Niece...great post. You are fortunate to have such good mentors to teach you the proper way to do things. Keep us up to date on this.
Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show
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#15
Hold on.....I need to get something staright here.....SO I should not reward my horse with a head pat??? Reward on the neck or withers instead? Why is this?? I am very interested in knowing the why's and what for's....I have been scratching my horse on the forehead when she does the right thing....am I doing this wrong? I am confused.
Oh and great informative post Thank You!
Atrayou
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#16
I always give Max a little rub on the forehead when he does good. So does my trainer. I see nothing wrong with that. Just depends on my position at the time. If I am beside him I'll rub his neck. If I am in front of him I rub his forehead. His mouth always starts working either way.
"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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#17
quote:
Originally posted by Atrayou

Hold on.....I need to get something staright here.....SO I should not reward my horse with a head pat??? Reward on the neck or withers instead? Why is this?? I am very interested in knowing the why's and what for's....I have been scratching my horse on the forehead when she does the right thing....am I doing this wrong? I am confused.
Oh and great informative post Thank You!



Rub them where ever you want. There is no right or wrong way. Profit gets hugs, face rubs, ear pulls and kisses BUT he knows if we are working then he had better keep his mind on working and not on loving. [Tongue]

Flyer is 2 years old and a bit of a brat and she is trying to teach him to stand still and pay attention to her and keep his face out of her space. Therefore, when she is working him, his reward is a rub on the neck or shoulder because his head is supposed to be out in front not rubbing on her body, or curled around her trying to get some love.

When he is finished working then anything goes, but during practise he is supposed to be standing still, with his body straight.
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#18
Hooks niece,
Hello, and welcome!

I am waiting for your next post on this. I really enjoyed reading the first one, from your point of view. When you have been around horses for many many years, you tend to forget some of the things a "new to horses" person sees and feels.
Evaerything tends to get kind of automatic.
I have a kid in the nieghbourhood here, that I am helping with a first horse situation. Your posts will help me alot, to remember how it feels.

Again, I enjoyed that post, and am waiting for more please!
Ride safe, return safe.

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#19
Hello and Thanks mtn rider.

The next post will be in a little over a week, not out on the farm this weekend, stuck in the city working *sob* but next weekend, because it's the Canadian Thanksgiving I have an extra day to work with Flyer.
Keep Smiling, it makes people wonder what you're up to!
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