Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
I THINK THIS IS THE RIGHT DECISION IS IT
#31
Oh thats great you guys ihave it drilled in that a horse over 15 is Old but it makes me feel so much more happy about looking at 17 year olds knowing that yours are all happy healthy and ready to go. (hope i didnt offend anyone wasnt trying too)
Flooper thanks so much for the points to really check out thats exactly what i needed to know and am going ro copy them and take them with me and do everyone of them.
I have a fair bit of confidence in the owner and am sure he will say if he has any issues etc.

Im not sure of how we will bond i like giving lots of cuddles and pats when im happy etc with something a horse does right and i have a feeling this boy has been taught to do the right thing be told hes good and wait till asked for the next thing but i guess with lots of love and brushing and spending time together that may change

I just want to thank everyone of you who have taken the time to respond to my questions etc i cant tell you how much help you have all been as i now am looking at things so much differently
i am looking at things much more positive about riding fingers crossed for tomorrow morning
Reply
#32
[Image: untitled.jpg]
[Image: apr06_4.jpg]
These were taken about 2 months ago i think his belly doesnt look as bloated. Hope you arent getting sick of my posts
Reply
#33
He looks fine to me! It is natural for an older horse to have a bit more of a belly than a younger one, even when the older horse is in pretty good shape, since their backs tend to drop a little with age.

Kinda like with people, huh?

EZ2SPOT
Reply
#34
ahh i see its my back thats the problem LOL.im getting excited i know i shouldnt i think that this bot may be unrugged(not that is bad) and not given daily love as i know his owner is so busy so am concerned that we may not bond as im guessing he has been taught to stand and not look for love (does that make sence)
Reply
#35
Oh, I'm sure that, if you get him, he'll bond with you in time. It may just take a little time and he may show it in more subtle ways than you're used to. I'm sure you will pick up on each other's signals and will be fine. Just from reading your posts I'm certain you will be a kind, loving owner and the horse will respond in his own way. Just be patient and don't expect him to jump with joy right off the bat as some others may do.
"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


Reply
#36
Looks like a nice horse...not to far from the ground(my favorite kind) [Big Grin] or is it the rider is very tall?

Hey, even older horses can give you a run for your money! My 13H POA is 17 and can give any adult a run for their money if he thinks they don't know what they are doing! He also thinks he's the boss hoss...but a Tedday bear on the ground....
Reply
#37
Ok everyone hers the scoop!!! he is a sweetheart. he was easy to catch stood there half asleep being saddled his owner rode him around in a halterover poles sidepassing over the little bridge etc and he still looked kinda asleep but did everything asked of him with no hesitation just real calm. then stood there while we changed saddles and put a bridle on over the halter then he took the halter off and out thru his mouth. on i get and he was perfect loose rein etc moterbikes ging past just so relaxed.my partner wanted to get on and he has never been on a horse before after i rode and hopped off i stood there talking for ages and his head was in my arms and got heavier and heavier he was having a snooze lol.he is used to standing around for long periods when he at clinics etc and just rests.
He is actually quite a big old fella a good 15hh and solid there would be no problem at all leading my daughter around on him either he is just laid back.
I have told him i will be in touch and he said i am more than welcome to go there and ride him whenever i want even if they are not there.
Sam is a sweety
Reply
#38
I think you are on the right track, you have the right attitude and lots of good advice to follow from everybody here. I just thought of a few things you might want to keep in mind when you go to buy a horse:

1) No matter how sweet the horse is on the ground when you are handling him...even if he's really calm and loveable...remember he might be a totally different personality under saddle. Lots of horses are like Jeckyl and Hyde and really light up when the saddle goes on. Don't let a horse's good ground manners fool you into thinking he's gentle or well trained when it comes to riding. It can be a night and day difference.

2) In some instances, a current owner can make his/her horse perform, but a beginner/potential buyer might not be able to get the same results. It might be possible that the current owner has advanced riding skills that you might not have yet, and maybe that horse needs that type of rider. In other words, it's really important that YOU can make the horse behave and ride correctly (calmly, safely, obediently) when YOU ride the horse... and not just that you saw the other rider doing it. Does that make sense?

3) Remember that the horse's appearance comes in second to how he acts. No matter how pretty the color is, or if he has a pretty face, or even awesome spots...it's how he acts that matters. All that other stuff is icing on the cake!

Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)