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I THINK THIS IS THE RIGHT DECISION IS IT
#21
Hook said ("Thoroughbreds are normally a bit more high strung than the others. Definitely stay away from any horse that has been raced at a track. Some will turn out to be great horses but not for you at this stage.") I don't know how to copy a quote correctly so I just copied and pasted, but I agree with Hook. I would also like to add that I would stay away from barrel racers too. They like speed. Any breed used for a speed event is going to run a little on the hot side.
gaitingal

If you think I'm quiet, it's only because we aren't talking about horses!
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#22
quote:
Originally posted by spots

thanks Hooh i will make sure of a vet check with the older ones. its not color that i like its just i quess that the "western breeds" are what ive been used to here is a pic of the 17 yr old QH [Image: b0f2df1e.jpg]the man on him is a fairly big guy as you can see i am going to go ride him on the weekend hes life has mainly consisted of trail riding and being used for demos in his clinic



Looks like a nice solid decent conformation horse with a good attitude. Check out why he is being ridden in a hackamore instead of a bit. Tummy also looks a bit big in the picture so maybe find out worming schedule as well.

Good luck on your ride.

Getting cold "down under"?
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#23
Ok no barrel racers. There are lots of so called very quiet horses for sale 8 to 10 yo super quiet then you ask how long they have been broken in and so many have only just been broken so everyone here is right that its not just age but more the hours i need to look at.
He is ridden in a halter and a snaffel i think he just rides him in that as it makes the horse look to be quieter (doent need a bit in his mouth)i would use a bit.
The main thing is about this boy is he is used to all the moterbikes and kangaroos that are everywhere around here so thats a help. I will ask about worming etc Do you think he may have a pot belly as he is getting old and maybe not worked as much as he would have.
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#24
I don't think his tummy is excessive, just something to check. Could be just from a diet of free choice hay and less exercise.

Some barrel horses can trail ride real well and only get "up" when being gamed but as a rule are higher spirited.

This horse, if he passes a vet check, should be a good choice for you. You should be able to get a good three to five years or more of good solid hose interaction before you have to find another. The good experience will be invaluable in the future.

Try him , ride him, see if you click. Just don't rush into a relationship without checking out the field. Having a horse is a lifetime commitment.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#25
Spots, I just read this thread and I want to say I agree with everything that's been said in reply to your post. A green rider and a green horse might work out some of the time. Usually a new rider needs to build confidence and a green horse, no matter how sweet they are, is almost always the wrong choice.

You would have SO much more fun on a seasoned, reliable, and well-trained horse. You don't just need an older horse, you need a seasoned, reliable, and trained horse! Seasoned means he's been around the block, in other words: "been there, done that". Not much will freak him out. Reliable means he will be consistent and not surprise you with a whole new personality as he matures and goes through his life stages. A reliable horse is consistent and predictable, next week's ride is just like today's ride...which is exactly what beginning riders need to build confidence. And make sure you get a well trained horse. Not at all older horses are well trained.

I think your goal should be to get a horse that responds well to aids (your signals from hands, legs, voice, body position, etc) in a calm and obedient fashion. Avoid any horse that hasn't quite learned these things yet, like a green horse, but you also don't want one that is so overly responsive and trigger-quick that they wouldn't be very forgiving of a new rider and the mistakes they are likely to make from time to time.
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#26
that is so true as i said some people say how quiet and great etc and they have the years but not the hours in the riding side of things.
What should i look for in that its well trained. The last horse i had (sorry if i use the wrong worde etc to describe things as i really didnt know what things were called just how to get her to do these things lol) sidepassed backed turned on the haunches and forehandchanged leads um doing a figure 8 kept her head one way while travelling thru the 8 (does that make sense) walking in a straight line give her hip each side STOPPED slow or speed up.Do i need to try this kind of thing or just backup sidepass stop go. he will stand allday tied up as he has done this at clinics etc i am also going to ask a few people that have seen him at the clinics and get there opinion on him. I am trying very hard to forget his age and i guess his looks (i know im not meant to be looking at that)and just concentrate on a safe horse. The really good thing about this horse is he may be the answer to my other problem of something my daughter can learn on who knows
Hook i would say that he is only fed hay and is in a paddock without rugs etc (which is fine)
Horseylady i have an idea send me over your Sleepy Merlin LOL
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#27
Things I would check when I went to see him:

1. How easy is he to catch...make sure he isn't caught already so you can see what he's like when you walk up to him in the field.

2. How does he lead...pushy or relaxed? You already said he stands tied for long periods...that's great!

3. Brush him...see if he's touch anywhere or is headshy at all. Pick up his feet and clean his hooves and see how he does.

4. With him tied up, clap your hands, make lots of noise, holler, kick a metal bucket...see how he reacts.

5. Touch his ears, see if it bothers him.

6. Saddle and bridle him...see if he stands still (falling asleep is a positive!)

7. Have the owner ride him first, then you ride him for a while. Make sure he stand still and doesn't fuss while you're mounting. Try mounting from both sides. Make him stand for 2 or 3 minutes before you ride off.

8. See if he will ride out on his own away from the other horses without fusssing. Almost any horse will ride with other horses...the good, confident ones will ride out by themselves without acting like basket cases.

9. When out riding, see what he knows...sidepassing, backing, turning on forehand, trotting, loping, changing gaits, whoaing, standing still on the trail...whatever is important to YOU and how YOU ride, see if he can do it. When you head back to the barn, don't let him turn in, make him go back out again and see if he argues a LOT (most will argue just a little!!)

10. See if he rides double and/or bareback. With kids, you will at some point want to ride double (or they will with a friend).

11. Load him onto a trailer...see how he loads.

12. Go back one more time and do it all over again and see if he's the same horse as the first time.

These may not seem like real horsemanship things that the pros would probably check for...but I have found if a horse can do all of these things without problems, then they will be a good horse for me and my kids. A horse that is easy to catch, tack-ups quietly and will ride out on it's own makes it much more fun to ride, and so you end up riding a lot more...which gives you more experience and confidence. Hope these help!!! They have sure helped me find some very experienced, very quiet horses that are a joy to ride.
Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show
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#28
And hey, don't write off 17 as "old"... you just can't tell. I know a horse that's 37 and still wants to go-go-go. With a 17 year old horse, you could still have many many years of trails together.

'plash
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#29
quote:
Originally posted by puddleplasher

And hey, don't write off 17 as "old"... you just can't tell. I know a horse that's 37 and still wants to go-go-go. With a 17 year old horse, you could still have many many years of trails together.

'plash



Man, I'm glad to hear you say that, 'plasher. That's Dove's age[Wink].
"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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#30
quote:
Originally posted by puddleplasher

And hey, don't write off 17 as "old"... you just can't tell. I know a horse that's 37 and still wants to go-go-go. With a 17 year old horse, you could still have many many years of trails together.

'plash



Amen to that. I have three horses, two are 16 and one is 18...all of them strong, healthy and with lots of good years left.
Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show
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