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I THINK THIS IS THE RIGHT DECISION IS IT
#1
[Sad]aFTER LOTS OF THOUGHT ABOUT THIS I HAVE DECIDED THAT I AM GOING TO GET MYSELF A TRAINED HORSE THAT HAS DONE SOME SHOWS BENN OUT TRAIL RIDING ETC AS I REALLY DONT THINK I CAN BEAR THE IDEA OF RIDING DONALD OUT WHEN HE IS BROKEN IN (not his fault) i JUST THINK THAT AT THIS STAGE IN MY LIFE I WANT TO RELAX AND ENJOY A QUIET RIDE NOT BE WORRYING TO DEATH ABOUT GOING OUT.
iVE READ AND RE READ ALL THE POSTS AND DO KNOW BEG RIDERS CAN SURVIVE WITH A YOUNG HORSE BUT ALSO KNOW THAT ONE THATS DONE SOME STUFF WILL BE MUCH MORE PLEASANT.
DO YOU GUYS THINK IM JUST GIVING UP BEFORE I EVEN GIVE HIM A CHANCE OR DO YOU THINK IM MAKING THE RIGHT DECISION
THIS MAKES ME FEEL SICK IN THE STOMACHE
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#2
You are absolutely doing the right thing. If you are not confident riding Donald, you will find more and more excuses to not ride. Riding is about...well, riding!! I was in your same position...had a beloved 3 year old who needed a rider far more experienced than me. We did okay for almost a year, but eventually I got hurt on him, and knew I would always be nervous on him after that. So I got older, more experienced horses...and I absolutely love riding each of them...it is so much more enjoyable. And because it's enjoyable...I ride a lot more. And that's the whole reason I got a horse in the first place. Hope this helps.
Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show
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#3
Sometimes it works to stick with a horse, and sometimes it does not...every case is different! I had a horse that was super-sweet on the ground, but I simply could not ride him, and was injured by him twice before I gave up & sold him. Sounds to me like you have already decided...and there is absolutely no reason to feel guilty about wanting a horse you can be more comfortable and safe on!

EZ2SPOT
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#4
Yep it does help i do beleive that i would start making excuses to NOT ride.not only that he wouldnt be started until next year then winter would come and i would have excuses even more not to ride.
After seeing all the great trail rides etc that you guys go on i want a horse that will be safe for me to join a trail riders club and go out with them as well.
I do have my eye on an Appy gelding BUT he is only 4yo (i know still a baby) he has been shown but wasnt up to scratch as he doesnt have that real super slow lope reqd for western pleasure hes 15.3hh and gets more of the bobbing action the more hes slowed down. Hes good a trail classes thoand hunter if hes made to go. Anyways because he wasnt good enough for bigger shows etc hes been used for trail riding and has been very good at that he still lopes along nice and slow and is ridden on a loose rein
He has a relaxed nature and sounds very good BUT still is only 4.
Is 4 still to young???
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#5
Oh Flooper, your second sentence in your post just says it all!! I have been there, and some days still. Good rides leave you yearning for more. The bad ones .....ugh!!

Spots, 4 y/o is young, I'd suggest a pass. I'd get an older horse with lots of miles and years on trail, or whatever discipline you want to do. Get a confidence builder.

One can learn alot from training, but years to wait to ride off with your buddies safely and higher potential to be hurt. Can be frustrating.

I love my horses, but would choose them differently if starting over. I certainly understand the emotion involved. The longer you have them, the harder to sell (even the rotten ones sometimes!) You have a fresh chance.... take your time to find the right one. Trial period. One that you feel safe with....all the positives.
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#6
Only you can decide something like this. If it is right or wrong, only time knows.

I am a little upset about one comment you made
"iVE READ AND RE READ ALL THE POSTS AND DO KNOW BEG RIDERS CAN SURVIVE WITH A YOUNG HORSE "
For every single story you hear about a beg. rider and a young horse surviving(sp?) there is probably 10+ that didn't. It is not the norm for it to work. I know somepeople that it has worked for(to some degree) and they will talk like it is the greatest thing in the world. One will tell you that people that warn you against it are wrong and they don't know what they are talking about because her case worked. Yes her cased worked(to a degree) but that doesn't make it the norm. It doesn't matter how many stories you hear that it worked chances are still greater for it not working. Don't let anyone tell you that what you decided was wrong because they had a case that worked out.

What I mean by degrees is that what one person thinks of as a happy ended doesn't always mean you will think that. i know of a number of cases where the horse had to go through a lot of issues before they worked it out. Issues like poor training, poor health care, heavy hands, confusion, pain. Sometimes the horse will have problems for the rest of their life. Can the owner ride them? Yes and not do to bad but the horse paid for most of it. Others have great happy endings but for some the horse gets the short end of the stick.
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#7
im sorry i didnt want to upset anyone i was just saying that i know it can work as it has with others on here but i just dont think i can make it work and i think you need a special bond. I would never inflict pain and would have trainers etc help but i cant see a happy ending well i guess in years to come it may be but for now my main thing is im not looking forward to the day i have to ride him. im not a total beg rider but i am nervous and just want to feel safe and enjoy
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#8
Spots, I think you are making the right decision for both you and Donald. Young horses require constant training and reinforcement as they are just 'learning' about the partnership between themselves and us. You can never know from one day to the next just how that young horse will respond under saddle. I would recommend you go with an older horse, one no younger than 8. I've been riding horses for many, many years and 8 is the youngest horse I have ever owned because I understand that most younger horses will have issues.

You are making the right choice, and I'm sure Donald will go to someone who can continue his training and turn him into a nice riding horse.

Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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#9
It sounds like you are going to do the right thing, spots. It's hard sometimes, admitting that a certain horse and rider aren't the right match, for whatever reason. But Flooper is correct, you will find yourself riding less and less if you don't trust your horse. Don't consider this a failure by any means, but do try to think that if Donald is given the chance, he could be the perfect horse....for someone else.

I got a "project" horse a few years ago, when I wasn't really looking for a project horse....to this day, my mindset is that she requires my constant attention while riding her. This can grow tiresome at times when I just want a relaxing ride spent chatting with trail mates!
-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"
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#10
There is so much that has to work out between a horse and rider for that special partnership to bloom. Besides the training and experience of the horse and the rider, there has to be that click between the two. Just like certain people don't get along, certain horses don't get along with certain people and vice versa. I've ridden all kinds of horses in my 40 plus years in the saddle, and I have had a few that my personality just didn't jive with the horse. I didn't mind riding this type of horse, but to own him? No... it just wouldn't have worked out.

A good example was my Foundation Appaloosa gelding, Warrior. He was the easiest, gentlest, kindest, most forgiving of mistakes horse you could ever ask for... but he never gave me his all when I rode him. Why? Something was clashing between his personality and mine. Oh, I rode him, but I never felt that special kinship with him that I have had with other horses. It just wasn't there.

My first horse had a lot of issues when I bought her. She was the first one that I paid for, myself. I'd ridden for 7 years by the time I got her, and she was trained to ride. Once we understood each other (She had been abused and didn't trust people. It took all that first summer for her to learn that she could trust me and that I wasn't going to hurt her.), she was the best horse I ever had to learn from. She put up with a lot of stupid mistakes on my part, but I had that mare for 18 years, and I was with her when she died.

Now the reason I've told you about that first horse, is that if this had been an untrained 2 year old instead of a trained 5 year old, I'm sure I would've ruined that 2 year old beyond measure. Wimpy was old enough for me to learn from her, once we were over the "trust" issue. I couldn't have begun to learn what I did from her with a younger horse with little to no training.

So my advice is to listen to what everyone else in this thread has told you, so far. I totally agree with them 100%. If you don't feel comfortable on Donald, now, and have misgivings about riding him, chances are you always will feel that way. You need a horse that you will feel totally secure on... one that will feel like he will look after you once you get into the saddle and start riding down that trail. You will be more relaxed, more comfortable, your horse will immediately feel this through the saddle and know that he can relax, too, and you will enjoy your ride ten fold.

Happy Trails, my friend, and may you find that special partnership that will last a life time[Smile][Wink].
"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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