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Strangles Vaccine
#1
Interstingly, I learned today that my vet (one of the most prestigious practices in Lexington, KY) is not administering the intra-nasal strangles vaccine. They will sell it to owners to administer themselves, but the vets of the practice will not adminster it. When I queried why, I was told it was because of the possibility of the horse devleoping an abscess. Kentucky has been having a bout of strangles cases, particularly in the horse racing realm.

I know that the intra-nasal vaccine is a modified live virus instead of a killed virus and that there is a greater risk of abscesses developing in the event this vaccine is given in conjunction with other vaccines (e.g., injection sites of other vaccine administrations can become abscessed; or that if a horse is incubating a field strain of the bacteria, I know this can cause an even more severe infection; or it can cause purpura hemorrhagica in horses who are recovering from recent infections.)

I always vaccinate for strangles a week or so after I immunize my horse with other vaccines, to circumvent any abscesses from the injection sites.s

Has anyone else had their vet not want to administer the intra-nasal strangles vaccine?

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#2
quote:
Originally posted by appygirl

Interstingly, I learned today that my vet (one of the most prestigious practices in Lexington, KY) is not administering the intra-nasal strangles vaccine. They will sell it to owners to administer themselves, but the vets of the practice will not adminster it. When I queried why, I was told it was because of the possibility of the horse devleoping an abscess. Kentucky has been having a bout of strangles cases, particularly in the horse racing realm.

I know that the intra-nasal vaccine is a modified live virus instead of a killed virus and that there is a greater risk of abscesses developing in the event this vaccine is given in conjunction with other vaccines (e.g., injection sites of other vaccine administrations can become abscessed; or that if a horse is incubating a field strain of the bacteria, I know this can cause an even more severe infection; or it can cause purpura hemorrhagica in horses who are recovering from recent infections.)

I always vaccinate for strangles a week or so after I immunize my horse with other vaccines, to circumvent any abscesses from the injection sites.s

Has anyone else had their vet not want to administer the intra-nasal strangles vaccine?





Well, my vet just came out Sat. to give Cloud all her spring shots and take blood for Coggins, and he saved the intra-nasal strangles vac. until last. He said he does this so that nothing (needles, etc.) can get contaminated.

Should I be watching out for something? Abcess where? What does one look like?
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#3
My understanding is this . . .

since the intra-nasal strangles is a modified-live virus (instead of a killed virus like in most vaccines), if given in conjunction with other IM injectible vaccines, an abscess can form where those other vaccines were given if that area was not disinfected well or a contaminated needle was used. That is why I wait a week to give my IN Strangles.

If your vet was comfortable giving the IN after pulling the Coggins and administering the spring shots, then it should be fine. I would reccomend that in any case, whenever an injection is given that you check the injection site for 2-3 days to make sure a reaction (swelling, stiffness, tenderness, infection, etc.) isn't occurring. I always note what side of the neck each injection was given.

Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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#4
Appygirl, she does have swelling on the left side of her neck. It's not high swelling, just raised a little. In terms of size, it's probably 2 inches x 4 inches, but again, not high. That would have been an injection site and not the Coggins (as I recall that's done in the neck in the front).

I did tell the vet about it and he didn't think it sounded like something to worry about, just keep an eye on it. Not to doubt him, but is that consistent with your knowledge also?

She's acting perfectly normal, eating fine, drinking fine, pooping normally, etc. So does the presence of a raised area give you any alarm?
Carol
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#5
I spoke with Dr. Dorton this afternoon about what his misgivings are in administering the intranasal strangles vaccine. He said that he hasn't used the IN form of the vaccine in several years because of the possibility that it will cause an abscess internally. He had 3 or 4 horses die after receving the injections. When the necropsies were done on the horses they had strangles abscesses in their chest tissue, between their lungs (can't remember the medical term he gave for it. And I do not know if this would necessariliy be bastard strangles, but then again it might.) He said that none of the horses had a hx of being exposed to the strangles virus or any other illness. His experiences with the 3 or 4 fatalities was enough to sway him away from using the intranasal form of the vaccine. He does use the IM version of it, which has been acclaimed to potentially cause localized abcesses at the injection site, but nothing internally. He said he would make it a point to give the strangles vaccine injections in the chest and not the neck or hindquarters where more stiffness and swelling would potentially occur.

Even though I have used the IN strangles vaccine for several years, my talk with Dr. Dorton has me thinking that I may go to the IM injection.

OTW, I believe what you ae seeing in your horse is a localized reaction to whatever vaccine was given. Keep an eye on your horse, take his temp a couple of times a day. Look for nasal discharge, depression (not eating/drinking) etc. I'm sure all will be well

I always note which shots I give where. I gave Hi-Grey his shots tonight. WNF - right side of neck; EEE/WEE/VEE and tetanus toxoid, left side of neck; equine influenza and rhinopneumonitis, left chest. That way if there is a reaction, I can tell my vet what shot was given where.




Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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