Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Flies, Flies and more Flies!!
#11
this works pretty well for me:
1. pyranha spray every day or two
2. swat in ears and on midline for gnats
3. predator wasp larvae spread around pasture every 3 weeks
4. equitrol II in feed every day
5. fly masks
good luck!
Abby
Reply
#12
quote:
Originally posted by Stormie

You have to watch the garlic as some horses do develop problems with it. Also how well it works seems to depend on the horse and how the owner feels about it....but that is true about anything really. Just keep in mind that some horses have developed problems so if something does come up then make sure you bring up the garlic to your vet. I don't remember for sure but it was something to do with the blood.



I hadn't heard this before so I went looking for studies...there aren't many...seems garlic supplementation is a lot more controversial than I expected! But at high doses garlic seems to induce a type of red blood cell anemia. Learn something new every day! Thanks for pointing this out Stormie! Here's the link if anyone wants to read the study. http://equinecentre.co.uk/vet12.htm

I used to use the garlic that comes in the supermarket already minced, packed in water. It did seem to help.... I'd be careful using freeze dried as the concentration of garlic would be higher. I did not find any "safe" dosage in a valid veterinary source.
<'\__~
_(( // ====

Reply
#13
Yes, I went online to study up on the garlic issue also. A little too controversial for me being the newbie that I am. However, went to a vet's office today (long story....see my other post "BLONDIE FOALED" if you're interested in my harrowing afternoon) and picked up a brochure about SOLITUDE IGR. Anyone ever hear of it? Supposedly you give 1/2 ounce daily..it's pelletized...and when excreted it prevents the fly larvae from developing into adults. Then you only have to treat adult flies already in existence. Says it takes 2 weeks to see results, but full benefit is within 4-6 weeks. Sounds super if it really works. Of course, the usual steps of removing manure, standing water areas, etc. should still be practiced.
3B Lady

Always speak to your horse as you would a gentleman.
Be kind, be gentle, be patient.
Reply
#14
Maybe it's just me, but I'm very leery of the feed through fly control products. If it's poisonous to the flies, I can't see where it would be too good for the horse to eat. I'm not sure how much test data has been accumulated for enough years to know exactly how they are affecting the horse. JMO.
"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


Reply
#15
I definitely understand what you're saying. The brochure says "Cyromazine is not an organophosphate. It has been successfully and safely used in horses since 2001, as well as intensely studied in other species for more than 20 years. Once excreted, Solitude IGR breaks down to a malamine monomer, a slow release nitrogen fertilizer." It's made by Pfizer. I'm checking into all sorts of avenues for fly control just like everyone else. I'm just newer at this than most of y'all. I guess it's human nature to try to find the easiest solution.
3B Lady

Always speak to your horse as you would a gentleman.
Be kind, be gentle, be patient.
Reply
#16
We have used the feed through control for a few years with no problem's.For sensitive horses we use apple vinegar diluted with water.It helps with gnat's and fly control.On the negative side it does have a smell.ride safe
Reply
#17
I've never noticed problems with the garlic with my horse, and as you said there's no reference for what is considered "high dose". However, I only used about a tablespoon a feeding, as a supplement to fly spray, Skin So Soft, and fly masks, as well as good manure cleaning. I don't think there's one solution to the problem, but more a system for dealing with them.
Live long, laugh hard, love horses.

Reply
#18
Hi I have a pony who is very sensitive to fly's and bugs. This is what I do, I try to target all area's of the stable.
1. fly mask's
2. Off,(people spray) wipe on ears, face and mask.
3. Fly Terminator traps (toss n trap, or simular)
4. 1gl. bug spray Indoor/outdoor, can get at Lowe's, Walmart, ect.
Spray entire barn except feed & water area's.
5. fly sray for whole body, I,ve always liked repel-x that you mix.
6. Equi-Spot,

I try to use the Equi-spot sparingly, my pony is a little sensitive to it.
In the past I have tried feeding Apple cider, I would not recomend it. I had an older pony I fed it to. She had some small lumps in her neck, two week's after I started feeding the cider the lumps started to grow along with about twenty more all across her body. After doing some research on the subject I found out that cider can upset the acidity levels in the body and cause tumors to grow. My pony is lumpy but not in any pain, and retired.
As for the Indoor/outdoor bug sray, I figure it's safe to use in the home it should be ok for the barn. I started to use it two year's ago after a student got bit by a spider. It help's a lot with all the bugs. I hope this was a help.
Reply
#19
quote:
Originally posted by Mandyh

2. Off,(people spray) wipe on ears, face and mask.

Mandy, it sounds like you've got a comprehensive plan going.
I seem to recall, and I don't know if it was on this forum or not, that last year someone told me that the DEET in Off was toxic to horses. I was carrying it on trail rides and using it on Max's rump during horsefly season (he hates those!) Seemed to help.
Does anybody know about this DEET issue? As much as it is used on people, I have my doubts that it could hurt horses.
"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


Reply
#20
hmeyer; I know some horses are very much allergic to it, but I've used Off & Cutter on my horses for years with absolutely no problems. It usually will keep all insects off my horse for a good two hours, and I only use it when I'm trail riding... never every day or on a regular basis. If I was to try it on a new horse, I'd spray it very, very lightly on one spot and wait to see if the horse reacts to it. I definitely would not spray it around my horse's eyes. And when I do use it, it's just one fast sweep over the horse and takes only a second for that one sweep. I do this until I've sprayed down the entire horse. Then, I'll spray some on my hands to wipe down the face, head, and ears.
"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)