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Blue foaled!!!!
#11
Thanks Stormie! I appreciate the information. I knew that something didn't seem right with the foal looking "chocolate brown" coming from a blue roan and black overo. Blue is definitely a true Blue Roan, no doubt about that. So, I'll just wait until the foal loses that fuzz and see what she looks like. Also, I definitely need to wait until then before I register her, huh? Would hate to have to go back and get her papers corrected at a later date! Oh, I love this website. It's so easy to get answers to puzzling questions without having to pull out the books or search the internet! Thanks again, Stormie!! Meanwhile, Blue still hasn't come up to the corral for her grain. She made it to the closest pasture for a taste or two of hay and went back down to the back pasture. I took a bucket of grain out to the pasture and just set it down and walked off, thinking she might go to it and eat some. Nope! Just looked at me then walked off in the opposite direction. I guess I shouldn't worry about her as we have plenty of grass out there since all of our rain, but she is REALLY protective of that baby. More so than Beauty was or is with hers. They're all different aren't they? Beauty actually let us pet little Rain this morning.
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#12
Hawk

Brown is one of those colors that just confuse the heck out of people. Tecch. They don't know what causes it because each group lists it differently. Some believe it is a form of bay and others believe it is a form of black. A Brown is really a horse that looks black or dark, dark bay but has tan in the soft areas. This this mare. In the winter she looks black with the tan, in summer she bleaches out to a bay with tan. Some groups will reg. dark dark bays as Brown. Others will only reg. ones with tan as Brown.

The first rule of figuring out a color is to get rid of all of the white markings. That can make it hard when a bay has white legs so high it hides the black legs. A Bay will always have black legs just some happen to have white over it. And since Bays are born with silver/grey legs that throws some people off.

Colors are made confusing by the breed groups. You can have a chestnut with a black mane and tail. My sister's horse looks like a bay from the chest up but a chestnut from the chest down. Being out of a chestnut and a palomino the only color he could be is chestnut. So if you have a horse that looks like a bay with out black legs it's a chesnut. A Brown should have black legs.

Remember all horse colors are either Red or Black based. Most black based colors will have black legs, the ones that won't are Silvers, Smokey Creme, and older greys. All red based colors will have red, brown, gold or a cremish color.
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#13
opps hit the wrong button!!

Here are the photos of my Brown mare.

[Image: Coalblack.jpg]

[Image: Coalpl.jpg]

[Image: MVC-005S.jpg]

[Image: MVC-008Sw.jpg]





3B

You might also have to wait to see if it turns out Roan or not. It's hard to see Roan in the first foal fuzz. You can clip a spot on the butt to see but I don't think that's going to work in this case!! If the foal is a roan you should see it after the first foal fuzz. What breed? You might also have to get photos to reg. too.
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