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Mama Flash Foaling Pictures
#11
quote:
Originally posted by PaintHorses

Great photos! I am looking forward to my mare's foaling this week. I hope to get photos as good as these, keeping my fingers crossed it will be tonight or tomorrow. Or at least this week lol, he is a beauty, and I like the name Fax Me Another since she did want a filly it seems appropriate, but the other name was good too. Congrats!



Good luck with your mare. Flash waxed the day before and the wax was very heavy on the morning she foaled. Mrs Hook and I were doing 4 hour shift watching Horse TV from Friday night on. I was just starting my nap on Saturday afternoon when Mrs. Hook saw the water break and got me up. Camera was in the barn prepared and I guess I was thinking of how to show the event to every one when I took the pictures.

Flash had been increasingly restless starting Friday, so something to watch for on your mare. If you noted from the photos the umbilical cord was huge and would not have separated by itself. The vet by phone told us to tie it off tightly with a strong twine 4 to 6 inches from the navel and cut it with the sharp scissors prepared in advance by Mrs. Hook.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#12
Hook, great photos! I cannot believe how fast that went, water breaking at 3:25 and foal totally out of the cooker and standing on his own two hours later? Whew!!!

In photos 10 and 11, Flash has her mouth on/at his foreleg. What is she doing?

Without human help, how does momma get the sack off and get the baby standing? How does umbilical cord normally separate?

This must have been phenomenal to observe in person.

You did a great job with the photos. The photos on your second link (what I would call the "postcard photos") are unbelievable. It's amazing to me that what came out (all legs) can be walking, romping THAT FAST!!!

Thanks very, very much for taking the time to post all these photos, they have been an absolute joy!!

Again congratulations, it looks like everything has turned out as perfectly as would be possible!
Carol
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#13
Great pics, Hook! Thanks for sharing!!
Karen ~ Trails  
  &
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN

"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."
[Image: th_horse-galloping.gif]  

~~~~~~
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#14
OTW~

I would say his momma is smelling him. They do that quite a bit so they can recognize their babies.

To help answer your other questions, the sac will normally break around the foal's feet and nose. There are times when the sac can be quite thick and will need to be broken (i.e., if a mare is fed fescue grass or hay.) The umbilical cord will usually break about 4-6 inches from the foal's navel; however, there are times when the umbilical cord can be very thick. If the cord does not break on its own it will need to be cut (tying it off above and below the area to be cut and then using a sharp pair of disenfected scissors.) If the cord does not break itself, the foal can be injured when he pulls against it when trying to stand.

The foal will lay and rest for awhile (being born is hard work). After that he'll start trying to figure out those long legs and gravity. Doesn't take long before he'll get the hang of it and get on his feet. At that point, he'll be hungry and will start searching for his first milk. That's always funny to watch as he'll stick his nose everywhere looking for the teat.

Ahhh, man, now I'm wishing I had a mare again! lol

Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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#15
Great pics, Hook! You captured the birth sequence quite well. That umbilical cord sure was thick!
Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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#16
quote:
Originally posted by appygirl

OTW~

I would say his momma is smelling him. They do that quite a bit so they can recognize their babies.

To help answer your other questions, the sac will normally break around the foal's feet and nose. There are times when the sac can be quite thick and will need to be broken (i.e., if a mare is fed fescue grass or hay.) The umbilical cord will usually break about 4-6 inches from the foal's navel; however, there are times when the umbilical cord can be very thick. If the cord does not break on its own it will need to be cut (tying it off above and below the area to be cut and then using a sharp pair of disenfected scissors.) If the cord does not break itself, the foal can be injured when he pulls against it when trying to stand.

The foal will lay and rest for awhile (being born is hard work). After that he'll start trying to figure out those long legs and gravity. Doesn't take long before he'll get the hang of it and get on his feet. At that point, he'll be hungry and will start searching for his first milk. That's always funny to watch as he'll stick his nose everywhere looking for the teat.

Ahhh, man, now I'm wishing I had a mare again! lol





Appygirl, thanks much for the answers! Now, I've always wondered why they say to tie off the umbilical cord before cutting it. Why is that, do you know? [confused2 If under natural conditions it just breaks on its own, it's not tied off, so what's the difference if you simply cut it?

Amazing to me how a brand newborn foal, feeling hungry for the first time, would know to start hunting ON Momma. "Gotta be here somewhere, where dat, where dat?" Horse teats are pretty well hidden way up there, unlike dogs where they are everywhere and super obvious to see. It's hard to fathom, when you stop and think about it, how those connections seem to just BE there.
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#17
Hook, great pictures!! I showed them to my 10 year old daughter and she was fascinated. She has seen puppies born, but never a foal.

Fax Don't Lie

Repeat The Fax

Incoming Fax

Fax of Life

Matter of Fax

The Indisputable Fax or The Undeniable Fax

Splash of Flash

Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show
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#18
OTW, you're a thinker, aren't you? lol

You tie off the umbilical cord before cutting it because the blood flow may not yet be staunched from the placenta. When the cord breaks on its own the blood flow has already ceased.

Amazing and quite cute and comical to watch when the foal looks for his first meal.



Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


Reply
#19
quote:
Originally posted by OnTheWay

Hook, great photos! I cannot believe how fast that went, water breaking at 3:25 and foal totally out of the cooker and standing on his own two hours later? Whew!!!

In photos 10 and 11, Flash has her mouth on/at his foreleg. What is she doing?
Flash is actually nipping on the foals foot to stimulate him to move and get up. The baby was lying still for longer than she thought was right and was making no attempt to get up and this made him more alert and he started making an effort to get up.

Without human help, how does momma get the sack off and get the baby standing?
The amniotic sack is normally quite fragile and is broken by the foal when they move their front feet and pop their nose out of it. Sometimes it is too tough and they need some help.

How does umbilical cord normally separate?
The umbilical cord normally has a def finite thinning near the naval that is quite noticeable and it separates there. In Flash's foal's case there was no definite thinning place. It is important that sufficient time has lapsed to make sure the last blood from the placenta has been received by the foal. As long as the foal and mare are quiet it is best to leave it alone. If the foal or mother's first movements do not not separate the cord, and there is no obvious separation thinning point you should get some veterinary advice and follow their instructions to cut the cord. Dr. Donna recommended tying off the umbilical cord 4 to 6 inches from the navel to prevent blood flow from the foal and cutting it in the mares side of the tie off. The end of the cord has to be immediately dipped in iodine to prevent any infection and this iodine dip has to be repeated three or four times a day until it dries up. This iodine dipping applies even if the cord separates on its own. If the cord is still oozing after two or three days the vet needs to be called to check it. Flash's foal's is drying up nicely.

This must have been phenomenal to observe in person.

You did a great job with the photos. The photos on your second link (what I would call the "postcard photos") are unbelievable. It's amazing to me that what came out (all legs) can be walking, romping THAT FAST!!!

Thanks very, very much for taking the time to post all these photos, they have been an absolute joy!!

Again congratulations, it looks like everything has turned out as perfectly as would be possible!
Carol

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#20
quote:
Originally posted by OnTheWay

quote:
Originally posted by appygirl

OTW~

I would say his momma is smelling him. They do that quite a bit so they can recognize their babies.

To help answer your other questions, the sac will normally break around the foal's feet and nose. There are times when the sac can be quite thick and will need to be broken (i.e., if a mare is fed fescue grass or hay.) The umbilical cord will usually break about 4-6 inches from the foal's navel; however, there are times when the umbilical cord can be very thick. If the cord does not break on its own it will need to be cut (tying it off above and below the area to be cut and then using a sharp pair of disenfected scissors.) If the cord does not break itself, the foal can be injured when he pulls against it when trying to stand.

The foal will lay and rest for awhile (being born is hard work). After that he'll start trying to figure out those long legs and gravity. Doesn't take long before he'll get the hang of it and get on his feet. At that point, he'll be hungry and will start searching for his first milk. That's always funny to watch as he'll stick his nose everywhere looking for the teat.

Ahhh, man, now I'm wishing I had a mare again! lol





Appygirl, thanks much for the answers! Now, I've always wondered why they say to tie off the umbilical cord before cutting it. Why is that, do you know? [confused2 If under natural conditions it just breaks on its own, it's not tied off, so what's the difference if you simply cut it?

Amazing to me how a brand newborn foal, feeling hungry for the first time, would know to start hunting ON Momma. "Gotta be here somewhere, where dat, where dat?" Horse teats are pretty well hidden way up there, unlike dogs where they are everywhere and super obvious to see. It's hard to fathom, when you stop and think about it, how those connections seem to just BE there.




OTW. It is absolutely amazing how this works. Shortly after the foal is born they have a strong sucking reflex. Most times they will suck on anything that their nose hits. An experienced mare will normally guide foal to the right spot with their body position and Flash actually shoved him into position ( with a little help from me)and nipped his butt which seem to get him motivated to suck. A mare's udder gets quite big and is positioned just right for the foal when the foals body is almost parallel to the mare. I will try to get a photo from the opposite side of the mare when the foal is sucking to show you how they do it.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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